Lake Placid plans to update and replace many of the area’s aging pipes and sewer infrastructure on Main Street this year when the weather warms up in the spring. The city’s mayor claims that the repairs and renovation are required due to state orders. The village also plans to complete the work before the rush of summer tourists come to the area.

A more severe round of renovation and repairs will follow the initial phase.

The aging infrastructure in Lake Placid mirrors a growing issue of aging infrastructure in the United States. Lawmakers are discussing $1 trillion in budget allotment for infrastructure spending. Donald Trump, U.S. President, has vowed to help repair the country’s infrastructure.

He calls for a new national rebuilding.

Many bridges are 50 – 100 years old, sewer systems are 100+ years old in many areas, and roadways need repairs. Lake Placid, like many areas, are suffering from state requirements to make repairs without having the proper budget in place.

The area will conduct a sewer line replacement and repair that may use trenchless sewer repairs to keep costs down.

A second round, which many in Lake Placid suggest may occur in 2019, may see a complete rebuild of Main Street. Residents and business owners fear that the “rebuild” may result in a loss of income for businesses. Lawmakers claim that the final product will be better for tourists and business owners despite the loss in revenue.

The board is mulling over the reconfiguration of Main Street’s storm drains and streetscape. The village has committed to a green initiative in spring 2018 that may add trees along sidewalks and even water filtration through the area’s soil rather than diverting it into Mirror Lake.

The area’s infrastructure is 110 years old, making the upgrade a necessity. The spring’s project is expected to cost $1.52 million, with zero-interest loans and grants provided to the city. The project will include a wastewater line that runs from Mirror Lake Inn down to Mid Park.

The wastewater line’s replacement has been on hold since 2004 when the Department of Environmental Conservation ordered the village to replace the line. The new wastewater line will also be more effective and efficient with the removal of the lift stations under Lake House hotel.

Lift stations require power to push the water upward, but when power outages occur, property owners must rush to generators to connect to the lift to ensure wastewater doesn’t impact operations. The higher pipe will run higher, eliminating the needs for lifts and alleviating the responsibilities of property owners.

Construction is slated to begin in March and parking will remain limited. Construction, if all goes as planned, will be finished by Memorial Day. The goal is to have the construction project complete before the tourist rush to ensure the tourist season isn’t impacted for local businesses.

Business owners along Main Street have voiced their concerns and state that the timeframe to complete the project is unrealistic. Small business owners assert that the project will be good for the town but will have an immediate impact on small business owners.