Author: Editor - Education News

Oxford University raises £750m from biggest bond issue

Oxford University raises £750m from biggest bond issue By Sean Coughlan BBC News education and family correspondent 1 December 2017 From the section Family & Education Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Oxford University has raised a record amount of funding for a UK university bond issue Oxford University has revealed that it will raise £750m from its first bond issue – the biggest amount raised this way by a UK university. It is the most significant example so far of universities turning to the capital markets for investment rather than student fees. It will mean more funds will...

Read More

Vice chancellor’s £72,000 pay rise ‘beggars belief’

Vice chancellor’s £72,000 pay rise ‘beggars belief’ By Hannah Richardson BBC News education reporter 1 December 2017 From the section Family & Education Image copyright PA The vice chancellor of Southampton University was awarded a pay package of £424,000 last year – £72,000 higher than the previous year. Accounts show Sir Christopher Snowden was paid £352,000 in 2015-16, during which he was in post for 10 months. The university said the rise reflected the national higher education pay award of 1.1% across the sector. It comes days after the UK’s highest paid vice chancellor Dame Prof Glynis Breakwell stepped...

Read More

Numbers given extra exam time soaring

By Sean Coughlan BBC News education and family correspondent 1 December 2017 From the section Family & Education Image copyright PA Image caption The number of pupils being given extra exam time keeps increasing The number of pupils in England given 25% extra time in GCSEs and A-level exams because of a special need has almost doubled over five years. There have been warnings about schools gaming the system – but the latest figures show the numbers getting allowances in exams continuing to rise. The exam watchdog, Ofqual, says it will contact schools with unusually high levels of pupils...

Read More

Should young children be grouped by ability?

By Katherine Sellgren BBC News family and education reporter 1 December 2017 From the section Family & Education Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Is the race starting too young? Should children as young as three, four and five be taught by ability? Grouping children like this in nursery school, Reception and Years 1 and 2 is increasingly common across England, according to a report by University College London’s Institute of Education and the National Education Union. The study raises concerns about the impact of teaching by ability on pupils’ confidence and aspirations. But while some are critical of...

Read More