Author: Editor - Health News

Peanut allergy treatment ‘lasts up to four years’

Peanut allergy treatment ‘lasts up to four years’ By Katie Silver Health reporter, BBC News 17 August 2017 From the section Health Image copyright Thinkstock An oral treatment for peanut allergy is still effective four years after it was administered, a study has found. Children were given a probiotic, with a peanut protein, daily for 18 months. When tested one month later, 80% could tolerate peanuts without any allergic symptoms and after four years, 70% of them were still able to eat peanuts without suffering any side-effects. Food allergies have risen dramatically in recent decades, with peanut allergy one...

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Nurses Learn How to Get Patients to Say ‘Yes’ to Blood Thinners

THURSDAY, Aug. 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Online training for nurses increased hospital patients’ use of medication that can prevent potentially deadly blood clots, a new study reveals. Nurses sometimes won’t give the blood thinning drugs if patients don’t want them. So researchers developed the training to teach nurses how to respond when patients say they don’t want to take blood thinners. The study included more than 900 nurses at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore. After the online training, the number of patients who refused to take prescribed blood thinners dropped from 12.4 percent to 11.1 percent, the findings showed. “We teach in hopes of improving patient care, but there’s actually very little evidence that online professional education can have a measurable impact. Our results show that it does,” study senior author Dr. Elliott Haut said in a Johns Hopkins news release. Haut is vice chair of quality, safety and service in the department of surgery at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Each year, 350,000 to 600,000 people in the United States are affected by venous thromboembolism (VTE), a blood clot that forms in a vein (often in a limb). And more than 100,000 of those people die when a clot breaks off and travels to a lung. That’s more deaths than from breast cancer, AIDS and motor vehicle collisions combined, the researchers noted. According to study first...

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Which Heart Bypass Surgery Works Best?

THURSDAY, Aug. 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Five years after heart bypass surgery, patients whose operation was done using a heart-lung pump lived longer than those whose surgeons didn’t use the device, a new study finds. Since the 1990s, two different approaches have been commonly used by heart surgeons to perform coronary artery bypass graft operations. Coronary artery bypass creates new routes for blood to flow to the heart because old routes are blocked by plaque in the artery. A piece of blood vessel is taken from another area of the body (often the leg) and used to “bypass” a blocked vessel going to the heart, according to the U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. The two different ways to do this surgery have been referred to as “on-pump,” assisted by a heart-lung machine, or “off-pump.” Which procedure produces better results has been controversial, the researchers said. “The heart-lung machine allows you to stop the heart so you can sew the grafts with no blood flowing through it,” said senior researcher Dr. Frederick Grover, a professor of cardiac surgery at the University of Colorado. This enables the surgeon to work on a heart that is fully exposed and not moving, he said. When operations are done on-pump, surgeons are able to do more grafts. In off-pump surgery, the heart is a moving target as it continues to pump...

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4 Ways to Jazz Up Your Salad

THURSDAY, Aug. 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Salads are a diet staple for good reason — they’re low calorie and filling. But they can also become boring, and if you need high-fat dressings to jazz them up, you defeat their purpose. Here are four ways to rethink your salad. Start by experimenting with new leafy green varieties like spicy watercress and arugula or nutrient-rich kale and collard greens, according to ChooseMyPlate.gov from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Spinach also makes a great salad base and a tasty alternative to lettuce. Look for salad mixes at the supermarket or toss together your own combinations. When building your salad, go beyond typical tomato-and-cucumber. Cup for cup, cooked or raw vegetables have fewer calories and add taste as well as nutrients. Try veggies from asparagus to zucchini — artichoke hearts, Brussels sprouts, broccoli, cauliflower, string beans, peas and peppers, to name a few. Also, excite your taste buds by trying different textures — grate or dice vegetables rather than just slicing them. You can easily turn a side salad into a meal by adding half a cup of beans — you’ll get fiber, some protein and great taste. For even more protein, try boiled shrimp, diced chicken, hard-boiled eggs (especially the low-calorie whites) or tuna flakes. When you add a wide variety of healthy foods to your salad, you won’t have to...

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Doctors Warm To Single-Payer Health Care

Single-payer health care is still a controversial idea in the U.S., but a majority of physicians are moving to support it, a new survey finds. Fifty-six percent of doctors registered either strong support or were somewhat supportive of a single-payer health system, according to the survey by Merritt Hawkins, a physician recruitment firm. In its 2008 survey, opinions ran the opposite way — 58 percent opposed single-payer. What’s changed? Red tape, doctors tell Merritt Hawkins. Phillip Miller, the firm’s vice president of communications, said that in the thousands of conversations its employees have with doctors each year, physicians often say they are tired of dealing with billing and paperwork, which takes time away from patients. “Physicians long for the relative clarity and simplicity of single-payer. In their minds, it would create less distractions, taking care of patients — not reimbursement,” Miller said. In a single-payer system, a public entity, such as the government, would pay all the medical bills for a certain population, rather than insurance companies doing that work. A long-term trend away from physicians owning their practices may be another reason that single-payer is winning some over. Last year was the first in which fewer than half of practicing physicians owned their practice — 47.1 percent — according to the American Medical Association’s surveys in 2012, 2014 and 2016. Many doctors are today employed by hospitals or health...

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