Author: Editor - Health News

Amid For-Profit Surge, Rural Hospice Has Offered Free Care for 40 Years

PORT ANGELES, Wash. — Rose Crumb can’t even count the number of people she’s helped die. The former nurse, 91, who retired in her mid-80s, considers the question and then shakes her head, her blue eyes sharp above oval spectacles. “Oh, hundreds,” estimates Crumb, the woman who almost single-handedly brought hospice care to this remote Pacific Northwest city nearly 40 years ago. But the actual number of deaths she has witnessed is likely far higher — and Crumb’s impact far greater — than even she will admit, say those affiliated with the Volunteer Hospice of Clallam County. “[Rose] let...

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Call for more Irlen Syndrome specialists in schools

Call for more Irlen Syndrome specialists in schools By Sophie Gidley BBC News 20 October 2017 From the section Wales Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Irlen Syndrome awareness week runs until Friday Calls have been made for more visual specialists in schools across Wales, to ensure children with Irlen Syndrome receive a diagnosis. Irlen UK said children are “being turned off education” because they are not aware they have the condition. It affects the brain’s ability to process visual information and can cause difficulty reading and writing. Education Secretary Kirsty Williams said all pupils have an eye test...

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Ulster Hospital discrimination case over food allergies

Ulster Hospital discrimination case over food allergies 20 October 2017 From the section Northern Ireland Image copyright Equality Commission Image caption Three-year-old Meabh O’Donnell and her seven-year-old sister, Aoibhe, both suffer from life-threatening food allergies A mother whose daughters have “life-threatening” food allergies took a discrimination case against a hospital after one had an allergic reaction. Maire-Iosa McVicker took her case after her children were twice exposed to food in an allergy clinic’s waiting room. The waiting room in the Ulster Hospital originally had signs banning food and drink because of the risk to patients. The South Eastern Trust...

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Can Aspirin Stop Liver Cancer in Hepatitis B Patients?

FRIDAY, Oct. 20, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Daily aspirin may reduce the risk of liver cancer for people with hepatitis B infection, a new study suggests. Hepatitis B virus attacks the liver and can cause cirrhosis and liver cancer. Previous research suggests daily low-dose aspirin therapy may prevent cancer, but there is little clinical evidence on whether regular aspirin use can prevent liver cancer in people with hepatitis B. Researchers from Taiwan analyzed data from close to 205,000 patients with chronic hepatitis B. They found that those on daily aspirin were much less likely to develop liver cancer over five years than those who did not take aspirin. It’s important to note, however, that the study only found these associations, but did not establish a cause-and-effect link. The findings are scheduled to be presented Monday at an American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases meeting, in Washington, D.C. About 240 million people worldwide have chronic hepatitis B, according to the association. While antiviral medicines can significantly reduce liver cancer risk in people with the hepatitis B virus (HBV), they don’t eliminate it and are not appropriate for everyone, said lead investigator Dr. Teng-Yu Lee. Lee is a researcher in the department of gastroenterology at Taichung Veterans General Hospital. “For effectively preventing HBV-related liver cancer, the findings of this study may help hepatologists treat patients with chronic HBV infection...

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Exercising With Asthma or Allergies

FRIDAY, Oct. 20, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Allergies and asthma can make exercise more challenging. But if your condition is well managed and you take a few precautions, you should be able to work out without worry. Know your allergy or asthma triggers and exercise around them. For instance, when the pollen count is high, exercise indoors with windows and doors closed. When you do exercise outside, avoid high-allergen areas like grassy fields, parks and heavily trafficked roads. Dry air can be particularly irritating to people with asthma while moist air often makes exercise easier. That might mean skipping endurance activities like cross-country skiing in favor of swimming in an indoor pool. When exercising outdoors, breathe through your nose rather than your mouth as much as possible — nasal passages filter air and trap allergens and irritants. Long-distance running and high-energy basketball are among the types of exercise more likely to cause exercise-induced asthma, or what’s now called exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, or EIB. Most people with asthma experience it when airways are narrowed from exertion, according to the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Talk to your doctor about a regimen of bronchodilators that may help prevent EIB, allowing you to exercise with less fear of an attack. Also, a 15-minute warm-up and a 15-minute cool-down may prevent or limit the severity of exercise-induced asthma. Never leave your home...

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