Author: Editor - Health News

Need Motivation to Exercise? Try the Buddy System

THURSDAY, Jan. 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Exercising with a buddy can give you both mental and fitness boosts. In fact, under the right conditions, the intensity and duration of exercise among workout partners can be more than twice that of solo efforts, according to research led by Kansas State University’s Dr. Brandon Irwin. Here’s how to make the most of a buddy relationship. Studies show that the best exercise partner is someone about 40 percent more fit than you are — this will motivate you to work out longer and harder. It’s called the “Kohler effect” — the ability to perform at a higher level when working with a stronger person. But if you’re a novice, you don’t want someone so far advanced that you could hurt yourself trying to keep up. If you’re in a fitness class and need to pair up, choose a slightly more experienced participant. If you like exercising at home or if logistics make it hard for you and your buddy to get out of the house at the same time, consider being internet partners — you can exercise simultaneously through a video chat. Although a human partner is the better motivator, if you can’t find one, try a virtual buddy. Many fitness apps let you create this motivational helper. Finally, if you’re the one providing the motivation, here’s a surprising finding to...

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Goodbye, Needles? Patch Might Be the Future for Blood-Sugar Tracking

THURSDAY, Jan. 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Developers of a new patch hope to eliminate a big barrier in type 2 diabetes treatment — painful finger-sticks and injections. The new patch — which actually uses an array of tiny needles that researchers promise are pain-free — senses when blood sugar levels are rising and then releases medication to bring those elevated levels back down. That means the patch could end the need to draw blood from your fingertips to check your blood sugar level. It could also eliminate the needles used to administer insulin or other diabetes medications. “This type of disposable patch is expected to control blood glucose levels for a week,” said the study’s senior author, Xiaoyuan (Shawn) Chen, chief of the laboratory of molecular imaging and nanomedicine at the U.S. National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering in Bethesda, Md. “It will not complicate the routines of daily living,” Chen said. Though the patch looks promising, so far it’s been tested only on 21 mice with type 2 diabetes. Results from animal trials aren’t always equaled in human trials. The patch contains chemicals that sense rising blood sugar levels. When that happens, a medication called exendin-4 is released to trigger the body to produce insulin until blood sugar levels start to fall. Exendin-4 is part of a class of drugs called GLP-1 receptor agonists. It’s currently...

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Most U.S. Babies Start Solid Foods Too Soon

THURSDAY, Jan. 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) — More than half the parents in the United States start feeding their babies solid foods before they’re 6 months old — the age now recommended by health experts, a new study indicates. Introducing solid foods or new drinks too early could deprive them nutritionally, the researchers warned. Waiting too long can also have negative effects, they said. “Introducing babies to complementary foods too early can cause them to miss out on important nutrients that come from breast milk and infant formula. Conversely, introducing them to complementary foods too late has been associated with micronutrient deficiencies, allergies, and poorer diets later in life,” said the study’s lead investigator, Chloe Barrera. Barrera is with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. The study involved a nationally representative group of infants included in the 2009-2014 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Researchers analyzed the food intake of almost 1,500 babies between 6 months and 3 years old. The babies’ parents were asked when they gave their babies anything other than breast milk or formula, including cow’s milk, water and sugar water. Babies who were bottle-fed exclusively or breast-fed for less than 4 months were most likely to be introduced to foods too early, the researchers found. The study showed that nearly one-third of U.S. babies...

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Common virus used to help fight incurable brain cancer

Common virus used to help fight incurable brain cancer By Michelle Roberts Health editor, BBC News online 4 January 2018 Image copyright SPL Scientists are optimistic that they may have found a new treatment to help people with incurable brain cancer. Ten patients so far in the UK have received the therapy, which is a virus that causes mild flu-like symptoms. The virus can cross the blood-brain barrier and appears to help “switch on” the body’s defence systems to attack the tumour, early studies suggest. Experts at University of Leeds and four other centres now plan to treat more...

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‘I was in a really negative terrible place’

‘I was in a really negative terrible place’ By Ian Westbrook Health reporter, BBC News 3 January 2018 Image copyright Getty Images “I was in a really negative terrible place…. and couldn’t see a way out.” This was the experience of one woman who suffered from depression and obsessive compulsive disorder during her second pregnancy. A quarter of pregnant women suffer from mental health problems, a study by King’s College London suggests. Anxiety and depression were not the only conditions to affect these women, with some suffering eating disorders, OCD and bipolar disorder. Maternal mental health: How far have...

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