Author: Editor - Health News

Blood Proteins Linked to Severity of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

MONDAY, July 31, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Chronic fatigue syndrome has no cure and reliable treatments remain elusive, but new research links it to changes in 17 immune-system signaling proteins called cytokines. That suggests inflammation plays a part in the disease, which can persist for years, according to researchers at Stanford University Medical Center. They said their findings could help doctors diagnose chronic fatigue and gauge its severity. It is also known as myalgic encephomyelitis, or ME/CFS. “There’s been a great deal of controversy and confusion surrounding ME/CFS — even whether it is an actual disease,” study senior author Dr. Mark Davis, said in a hospital news release. “Our findings show clearly that it’s an inflammatory disease and provide a solid basis for a diagnostic blood test.” Davis is the director of Stanford’s Institute for Immunity, Transplantation and Infection. Chronic fatigue syndrome affects more than 1 million people in the United States. Women are more often affected than men, and the condition often flares up first during the teen years, then again in a person’s 30s, the authors said. “Chronic fatigue syndrome can turn a life of productive activity into one of dependency and desolation,” lead author Dr. Jose Montoya said in the news release. Montoya is a professor of infectious diseases at the medical center. Some people recover within a year without treatment. But it persists for decades...

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Earth Will Heat Up by End of Century

MONDAY, July 31, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Whether or not you believe in climate change, the Earth is going to get hotter by the turn of the century, new research predicts. How much warmer? Approximately 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit), according to scientists from the University of Washington, in Seattle. That may not sound like much, but the researchers said it represents a long-anticipated “tipping point” for climate change. “Our analysis shows that the goal of 2 degrees is very much a best-case scenario,” said study author Adrian Raftery. He is a professor of statistics and sociology at the University of Washington. “It is achievable, but only with major, sustained effort on all fronts over the next 80 years,” Raftery explained in a university news release. In fact, there is just a 1 percent chance that planet warming will be limited to the 1.5 degrees Celsius set by the 2016 Paris Agreement, the researchers added. Study co-author Dargan Frierson pointed out that “countries argued for the 1.5-degree Celsius target because of the severe impacts on their livelihoods that would result from exceeding that threshold. Indeed, damages from heat extremes, drought, extreme weather and sea level rise will be much more severe if 2-degree Celsius or higher temperature rise is allowed.” Frierson, an associate professor of atmospheric sciences, added, “Our results show that an abrupt change of course is...

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HIV tests for new GP patients ‘can aid early diagnosis’

HIV tests for new GP patients ‘can aid early diagnosis’ By Katie Silver Health reporter, BBC News 31 July 2017 From the section Health Image copyright Getty Images Offering HIV testing when people register with a new GP in areas of high prevalence is cost-effective and could prolong lives, a new study says. Patients at 40 GP surgeries in the London borough of Hackney were given finger-prick HIV testing when registering. The study, in the Lancet, found this raised the rate of diagnosis four-fold. The Terrence Higgins Trust welcomed the findings and called on healthcare commissioners to act on...

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When Disaster Strikes, Don’t Forget Your Pets

SUNDAY, July 30, 2017 (HealthDay News) — People are urged to prepare for disasters by having an emergency plan, and animal experts say that your plan needs to include your pets. Hurricanes, tornadoes or floods can be unpredictable, and although no one can control the weather, people can control how prepared they are for these threats. If an evacuation order is given, it is best if you are ready to leave right away, said Angela Clendenin. She is a public information officer for the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences’ Veterinary Emergency Team. “One of the best ways to prepare your pet for a potential disaster is to create a ‘go kit’ of necessary documents and supplies, which people can easily grab and transport with them in the event of an evacuation,” Clendenin said. “When evacuation is delayed, roads can get jammed with traffic or become impassible with early flooding or debris,” Clendenin said in a university news release. “For those who need assistance with evacuating animals, resources may become scarce or non-existent as the threat from the disaster gets closer,” she added. “Evacuating early ensures that pets and their owners are able to get to safety before the disaster hits.” When preparing your emergency kit, be sure to also do so for your pets and livestock. Your pet’s emergency kit should include a few days’...

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