Author: Editor - Health News

Cooling Down Sibling Rivalries When They Heat Up

TUESDAY, Nov. 7, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Sibling rivalry — the jealousy and competition between your children — can start even before baby number two is born, according to experts at the C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital of Michigan Medicine. How siblings relate to each other and to parents can change as they go through the stages of childhood. Toddlers starting to assert themselves may squawk when a sibling grabs one of their toys. Elementary school kids who have learned about sharing may act out if they think a younger sibling — such as a newborn — is getting a greater share of attention than they are. Teens longing for independence may resent having to babysit for a sibling and show displeasure by snubbing the child or mom and dad. To tamp down the misbehaviors of sibling rivalry, give each child one-on-one attention that’s meaningful to him or her. That could be playing a board game with one and curling up to watch a movie with another. It’s also important to have quality family time, like eating dinner together and getting out for some exercise. Explain that there are times when one child needs more attention, like when sick or working on a big school project. If conflicts get out of hand, call a family meeting and allow everyone to express themselves. This gives even the littlest voice a chance...

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IUD May Lower Cervical Cancer Risk

TUESDAY, Nov. 7, 2017 (HealthDay News) — IUD contraceptive devices may reduce a woman’s risk of cervical cancer by about a third, a new review concludes. Researchers think IUDs might promote an immune response that kills off human papillomavirus (HPV), the virus that causes virtually all cases of cervical cancer. “The data say the presence of the IUD in the uterus stimulates an immune response, and that immune response very, very substantially destroys sperm and keeps sperm from reaching the egg,” explained lead researcher Victoria Cortessis. “It stands to reason the IUD might influence other immune phenomenon.” These results could be potentially lifesaving for young adult women who are too old to benefit from the HPV vaccine, said Cortessis. She is an associate professor of clinical preventive medicine at the University of Southern California’s Keck School of Medicine. “The vaccines don’t work unless the woman is vaccinated before she’s ever exposed to the virus,” Cortessis said. “That’s why we want 11- and 12-year-olds to be vaccinated, so they have time to be fully vaccinated and have a robust immune response before” first exposure. Unfortunately, HPV is so widespread that many contract the virus as soon as they initiate sexual activity, Cortessis continued. “Women in their 20s and 30s and 40s who haven’t been vaccinated are not going to be protected,” Cortessis said. “That means for decades to come this...

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Here’s Why You ‘Space Out’ After Too Little Sleep

TUESDAY, Nov. 7, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Ever notice that too little sleep at night can cause you to “space out” the next day? New research suggests that a lack of sleep hampers communication between brain cells, causing temporary mental errors that affect memory and visual perception. That can lead to problems ranging from minor ones such as forgetting your keys when you leave the house, to more serious consequences such as lack of awareness while driving. “We discovered that starving the body of sleep also robs neurons [brain cells] of the ability to function properly. This leads to [mental] lapses in how we perceive and react to the world around us,” said study senior author Dr. Itzhak Fried, a professor of neurosurgery at the University of California, Los Angeles and Tel Aviv University in Israel. Fried added that severe fatigue “exerts a similar influence on the brain to drinking too much. Yet no legal or medical standards exist for identifying overtired drivers on the road the same way we target drunk drivers.” The study included 12 epilepsy patients who had electrodes placed in their brains prior to surgery to pinpoint the origin of their seizures. They were kept awake all night to provoke seizures. The patients were asked to categorize a number of images as quickly as possible while the electrodes recorded the activity of brain cells that...

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Divers May Be Plunging Into Trouble

TUESDAY, Nov. 7, 2017 (HealthDay News) — A well-executed dive may look graceful and effortless, but competitive diving can take a toll on the body, a doctor warns. “Even when a dive is perfectly executed, injuries can occur, whether traumatic or from overuse,” said Dr. Nathaniel Jones, a sports medicine physician at Loyola University Health System in Maywood, Ill. Jones noted that a springboard diver strikes the water at up to 19 miles per hour and a 10-meter platform diver at up to 37 mph. After hitting the water, their speed drops by more than 50 percent in a fraction of a second. “These incredible velocities and impact forces are thought to be large contributors to competitive diving injuries,” Jones reported in a recent issue of the journal Current Sports Medicine Reports. “With such forces, injuries can occur not only in the setting of a dive gone wrong, but also more commonly secondary to an accumulation of exposures to repetitive forces,” he added. Training is a major factor in competitive divers’ high risk of shoulder, back, elbow, wrist and other types of injuries. Divers train an average of 40 hours a week. Springboard divers average 100 to 150 dives per day. Platform divers average 50 to 100 dives per day. This puts them at risk “for multiple individual injury opportunities and at times may lead to overuse injuries,” Jones...

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Does All That Social Media Time Harm Young Minds?

TUESDAY, Nov. 7, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, texting: Sometimes it seems today’s young adults are online more often than not. But new research suggests that the amount of time young adults spend on social media doesn’t seem to affect their risk for mental health problems. The finding came from a study of 467 young adults who were asked about how much time each day they used social media, the importance of it in their lives and the way they used it. They also were asked about mental health issues such as social anxiety, loneliness, decreased empathy and suicidal thoughts. The researchers found little association between the amount of time spent on social media and mental health problems. The results were published online Nov. 1 in the journal Psychiatric Quarterly. The only area of concern was what the researchers called “vaguebooking,” which refers to social media posts that contain little actual and clear information but are worded in a way meant to trigger attention and concern in those who read the posts. Young people who tended to write such posts were lonelier and had more suicidal thoughts than others, according to the study. That finding suggests that “some forms of social media use may function as a ‘cry for help’ among individuals with pre-existing mental health problems,” lead author Chloe Berryman, of the University of Central Florida,...

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