Author: Editor - Health News

‘Crohn’s disease’ patient had Heinz sachet in gut

‘Crohn’s disease’ patient had Heinz sachet in gut 3 January 2018 Image copyright British Medical Journal Image caption The patient said she had no memory of swallowing a sachet A woman who thought for years she had bowel disease was found to have pieces of a sauce sachet in her intestine. Doctors at Wexham Park Hospital, Slough, initially diagnosed the 41-year-old patient with Crohn’s disease after bouts of acute abdominal pain. A British Medical Journal report said that after being taken in for surgery, two pieces of Heinz plastic packaging were found perforating her gut. Once the pieces were...

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Crowded hospitals ‘put patients at risk’

Crowded hospitals ‘put patients at risk’ By Alex Therrien and Nick Triggle BBC News 3 January 2018 Image copyright Getty Images Patients are at risk in overcrowded hospitals as the NHS struggles to cope with the surge of patients seen in recent weeks, a senior doctor has said. Prof Suzanne Mason, from the Royal College of Emergency Medicine, described it as a “huge tragedy”. Reports have emerged of patients facing long waits for treatment and being stuck on trolleys in corridors and of ambulances left queuing outside A&E. NHS bosses said plans were in place to deal with the...

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Pharmacists Slow To Dispense Lifesaving Overdose Drug

Gale Dunham, a pharmacist in Calistoga, Calif., knows the devastation the opioid epidemic has wrought, and she is glad the anti-overdose drug naloxone is becoming more accessible. But so far, Dunham said, she has not taken advantage of a California law that allows pharmacists to dispense the medication to patients without a doctor’s prescription. She said she plans to take the training required at some point but has not yet seen much demand for the drug. “I don’t think people who are heroin addicts or taking a lot of opioids think that they need it,” Dunham said. “Here, nobody...

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‘Put The Fire Under Us’: Church Spurs Parishioners To Plan For Illness And Death

“It would feel like murder to pull her life support,” a young woman tells the doctor. The woman sits by a hospital bed where her mother, Selena, lies unresponsive, hooked up to a breathing tube. The daughter has already made one attempt to save her mother’s life; she pulled Selena out of the car and performed CPR when her heart stopped en route to the hospital — an experience she calls “beyond terrifying.” Now the doctor tells the family Selena will never wake up in a meaningful way. But the daughter says she can’t let her mother go: “I’m...

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Layer Up When Temperatures Plummet

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Two-thirds of the United States is grappling with bitterly cold temperatures as an Arctic front slides across the country, so one emergency doctor offers practical advice for those caught in the frigid weather. Dr. Robert Glatter, a physician from Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City, puts a premium on covering up and layering while “paying special attention to the head and scalp, as well as the nose, neck and ears. “In the cold weather, it’s important to keep your head, face and nose covered, but most importantly dress in layers to prevent heat loss,” he recommended in a hospital news release. Also, “it is advisable to wear sturdy insulated boots with thick wool socks which keep your feet and toes warm in the cold temperatures — especially while shoveling snow,” he added. Shoveling in cold weather is itself an activity that can boost the risk for experiencing a heart attack, Glatter noted. The risk is particularly concerning among those already struggling with heart issues, including high blood pressure and diabetes. To reduce such risk, he advised taking frequent breaks while at it, sticking to smaller shovel loads, and drinking lots of water to remain well-hydrated. Caffeine or alcohol can lead to dehydration and should be avoided, he said. Another concern: falling, slipping and back injuries. “People should wear sturdy, insulated boots...

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