Author: Editor - Health News

‘Off-Roading’ Threat May Lurk in the Air

FRIDAY, Sept. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Falls aren’t the only danger for kids who ride an off-road vehicle. In many parts of the United States, riders may also inhale hazardous mineral fibers and toxic dust, researchers warn. Four-wheel-drive and all-terrain vehicles “have been designed to operate in rugged, unpaved terrain, and they can produce copious amounts of dust,” said study lead author Chris Wolfe. Naturally occurring asbestos and other mineral fibers can become airborne in the dust generated while “off-roading,” said Wolfe, an epidemiologist at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. “This puts riders — particularly children — at risk of inhalation exposure,” he said in a hospital news release. Most deposits of naturally occurring asbestos are situated along the Appalachian Mountains and ranges in the West and Southwest, particularly California, according to background notes with the study. Deposits of erionite, an asbestos-like material, are also found in sedimentary rocks in the West. For the new study, researchers examined 15 previous studies investigating toxic mineral fibers and off-road vehicle use. The findings showed that many off-road vehicle trails are within 20 miles of these deposits. Dust from these trails can blow into other areas, the investigators noted. The risks posed by these potentially harmful substances led the U.S. Bureau of Land Management to issue an emergency closure of a portion of California’s Clear Creek Recreation Area in 2008. This...

Read More

IUD Won’t Interfere With Breast-Feeding

FRIDAY, Sept. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Women who have a hormonal intrauterine device (IUD) implanted immediately after childbirth can still breast-feed, according to a new study. There’s no reason for women to delay using this type of birth control after having a baby, researchers advised. “Bottom line: Early placement of a hormonal IUD is a safe, long-term birth control method that doesn’t negatively affect women who want to breast-feed their baby,” study first author Dr. David Turok said in a University of Utah news release. Turok is an associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology. For the study, researchers randomly divided more than 250 women into two groups. One group received a hormonal IUD within 30 minutes of giving birth. The other group received a hormonal IUD between four and 12 weeks after delivery. The study found that the hormones in the IUD did not delay lactation among the new mothers even if they had received the device immediately after giving birth. Eight weeks after giving birth, all of the mothers — with and without IUDs — were breast-feeding equally well. But there is a downside to early IUD placement: The device is more likely to become dislodged if it’s placed right after delivery, the researchers pointed out. Among the women in the study, 19 percent of those who received an IUD immediately after childbirth lost the device, compared...

Read More

More Teen Dads?

FRIDAY, Sept. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) — The number of teen mothers in the United States remained stable over two generations, but the number of teen fathers increased, new research shows. For the study, researchers analyzed data from two groups of about 10,000 people — those born in 1962-1964 and those born in 1980-1982. In both groups, about 8 percent of females were mothers at age 17. But the percentage of men in the younger group who were fathers at age 17 was nearly double the 1.7 percent seen in the older group, the findings showed. The study also found that teen mothers and fathers increasingly came from single-mother families with disadvantaged backgrounds. In addition, the percentage of teen mothers or teen fathers living with their partners didn’t change, but far fewer were married in the younger group. The findings were published recently in the journal Child Youth Care Forum. There are a number of possible reasons for the increase in teen fathers but not teen mothers, said study author Maureen Pirog, from Indiana University’s School of Public and Environmental Affairs. These include: more young men partnering with older women; state child support enforcement offices aggressively working to establish paternity; teenage girls selecting male partners closer to their own age; and increased reporting of teen fathers. Whatever the causes, the growing number of teen fathers is cause for concern...

Read More

Workers Without Paid Sick Leave Suffer Ill Effects

FRIDAY, Sept. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Lack of paid sick leave can cause mental distress for workers when they’re ill because they’re afraid of losing wages or their jobs, a new study says. In the United States, only seven states have mandatory paid sick leave laws, said researchers from Florida Atlantic University and Cleveland State University. “For many Americans, daily life itself can be a source of stress as they struggle to manage numerous responsibilities including health-related issues,” said study lead author Patricia Stoddard-Dare. “Making matters worse, for those who lack paid sick leave, a day away from work can mean lost wages or even fear of losing one’s job,” added Stoddard-Dare, an associate professor of social work at Cleveland State. These stressors all together have the potential to interfere with workplace performance and affect overall mental health, she said in a Florida Atlantic news release. The study included nearly 18,000 workers, ages 18-64, who took part in a federal government health survey. Of those, 40 percent did not have paid sick leave. Compared to those with paid sick leave, workers without that job benefit had higher levels of mental distress and were 1.45 times more likely to say that their distress symptoms interfere “a lot” with their daily life and activities. The most vulnerable were young, Hispanic, low-income, and poorly educated groups, according to the study. The...

Read More

Body Gestures Aid Conversation

FRIDAY, Sept. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Talking with your hands has taken on a new level of importance in communication, researchers report. They found that hand and body gestures got responses faster when someone asked a question during a conversation. The researchers analyzed question-and-response sequences as 21 volunteers interacted, and they found a strong link between body gestures such as head and hand signals and questions being asked and answered during the conversations. The results were published recently in the journal Psychonomic Bulletin & Review. “Body signals appear to profoundly influence language processing in interaction,” said study leader Judith Holler. She is from Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics and Radboud University Nijmegen, both in the Netherlands. “Questions accompanied by gestures lead to shorter turn transition times — that is, to faster responses — than questions without gestures, and responses come even earlier when gestures end before compared to after the question turn has ended,” Holler explained in a journal news release. Gestures that end early may offer an early visual cue that the speaker is about to end, thus helping the listener to respond faster, she suggested. Holler added that gestures that don’t end early may provide additional information that may help a listener process or predict what is being said in conversation. The findings “provide a first glimpse of the possible role of the body in the...

Read More