Author: Editor - Health News

Is Kissing Etiquette ‘Hardwired?’

MONDAY, July 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) — The long-awaited kiss is coming. Do you tilt your head to the left or the right? New research says most people are “hardwired” to turn their head to the right before locking lips with a romantic partner. “We as humans make lots of behaviors while interacting with others every day, but almost all the time we are not aware of the biases we have in those behaviors, such as in turning the head to one side during lip kissing,” said study lead author Rezaul Karim. He’s with the department of psychology at the University of Dhaka in Bangladesh. The study included 48 married couples in Bangladesh who volunteered to be observed while they kissed in their homes. More than two-thirds of kiss initiators and kiss recipients turned their heads to the right. Handedness predicted head-leaning direction in kiss initiators, but not in kiss recipients. The direction of kiss initiators’ head-leaning strongly predicted the kiss recipients’ head-leaning direction, which suggests that the kiss recipients try to match their partners’ head-leaning direction, the researchers said. The study, published recently in the journal Scientific Reports, adds to previous work conducted in Western countries, according to the researchers. “Prior works could not rule out cultural learning due to having Western samples. It turns out we, as humans, are similar even if our social values differ,” said...

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Even a One-Minute Run Might Help a Woman’s Bones

MONDAY, July 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Just a minute or two of running every day could strengthen your bones, new research suggests. British scientists found that women who engage in “brief bursts” of any high-intensity, weight-bearing physical activity had 4 percent better bone health than their less active peers. “We don’t yet know whether it’s better to accumulate this small amount of exercise in bits throughout each day or all at once, and also whether a slightly longer bout of exercise on one or two days per week is just as good as one to two minutes a day,” said study author Victoria Stiles. She’s a senior lecturer in Sport and Health Sciences at the University of Exeter. “But there’s a clear link between this kind of high-intensity, weight-bearing exercise and better bone health in women,” Stiles said in a university news release. For the study, the researchers compared data on more than 2,500 women. The women wore monitors for one week to track their activity levels, and underwent ultrasounds of their heel bones to assess their bone health. “We wanted to make every second count in our analysis, because short snippets of high-intensity activity are more beneficial to bone health than longer, continuous periods,” Stiles said. “We were careful not to ignore short bursts of activity throughout the day.” Women who exercised intensely for more than two...

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Does Your Child Really Have a Food Allergy?

MONDAY, July 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Many people misunderstand what food allergies are, and even doctors can be confused about how to best diagnose them, suggests a new report from the American Academy of Pediatrics. It’s common for people to think they have a food allergy, but the reality may be different, said Dr. Scott Sicherer, the lead author of the AAP report. “If you ask someone on the street if they have a food allergy, there’s a good chance they’ll say ‘yes,’ ” said Sicherer, who heads pediatric allergy and immunology at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. But a true food allergy involves an immune system reaction against a particular food, he explained. Just because you think a food upsets you, that doesn’t mean it’s an allergy, Sicherer said. And it’s critical to distinguish an allergy from other “adverse reactions” to food, he stressed. “Some people may have an intolerance, such as lactose intolerance,” Sicherer said. “Sometimes it’s a reaction due to food poisoning. Some people may just have a hard time eating a big meal.” Food allergy symptoms range from mild (hives and stomach cramps, for instance) to a life-threatening reaction called anaphylaxis — which can impair breathing and send the body into shock. People with true allergy need to avoid the problem food, and possibly carry an auto-injector of epinephrine (EpiPen) in case...

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Just a Few Vaccine Refusers Could Endanger Many

MONDAY, July 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) — With a small percentage of U.S. parents not vaccinating their children for “non-medical” reasons, a new study warns that even a few such families can trigger a big jump in local measles cases. Based on data collected by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the analysis projects that just a 5 percent drop in MMR (measles, mumps and rubella) vaccine coverage would triple the number of American kids aged 2 to 11 who would catch the highly contagious virus. “The meaning is that even small declines in vaccine coverage in children owing to vaccine hesitancy may have substantial public health and economic consequences that will be larger when considering unvaccinated infants, adolescents and adults,” explained study author Nathan Lo. Lo is an M.D./Ph.D. candidate in the division of epidemiology at Stanford University’s School of Medicine. He conducted the research with senior study author Dr. Peter Hotez, dean of Baylor’s National School of Tropical Medicine, in Houston. The study authors pointed out that — barring a medical (or other) exemption — all 50 states require that all children get the MMR vaccine, alongside a full complement of childhood vaccines, before enrolling in day care or elementary school. The rationale is that measles is both a deadly and easily transmitted illness. Even without face-to-face contact, the virus is capable of remaining airborne...

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Many Primary Care Docs May Miss Prediabetes

MONDAY, July 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Most primary care doctors can’t identify all 11 risk factors for prediabetes, a small new survey finds. Researchers from Johns Hopkins University said their findings should prompt doctors to learn more about this condition that affects an estimated 86 million adults in the United States and could eventually lead to type 2 diabetes. “We think the findings are a wake-up call for all primary care providers to better recognize the risk factors for prediabetes, which is a major public health issue,” said study first author Dr. Eva Tseng in a university news release. She’s an assistant professor at Hopkins’ School of Medicine. It’s estimated that 90 percent of those with prediabetes are unaware that they have the condition, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) explains that changes in diet, exercise and certain medications can help prevent people with prediabetes from going on to develop type 2 diabetes. To investigate why so many people with prediabetes go undiagnosed, the researchers asked primary care doctors attending a medical retreat to complete a survey testing their knowledge of key risk factors for the condition. The ADA has guidelines that list a total of 11 specific risk factors that determine if a patient should be screened for prediabetes. They include physical inactivity, a first-degree relative with diabetes,...

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