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Palestinians warn Trump against Jerusalem embassy move

Palestinians oppose any changes perceived as legitimising Israel’s occupation [Ammar Awad/Reuters] The Palestinian president’s office and senior officials have warned of the potential destructive effects of any move denying their claim to occupied East Jerusalem as the capital of their future state. The warnings comes as US President Donald Trump is due to decide as early as the next week whether to move the US embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. Reports emerged on Friday that Trump could again delay moving the embassy, but recognise Jerusalem as the capital of Israel, a move that would rewrite long-standing US policy...

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Africa solidarity is a ‘pillar of Palestinian struggle’

Abu Marzouk said he was confident African states could be relied upon to help isolate Israel [Reuters] Senior Hamas leader Musa Abu Marzouk has praised African states for the solidarity they have shown Palestinians in their fight against Israeli occupation. In an opinion piece he wrote for South Africa’s Mail and Guardian newspaper, Abu Marzouk called on African states and political parties to reject attempts to normalise relations with Israel. The deputy chairman of Hamas’ political bureau said Africans and Palestinians were brought together by a shared history of fighting colonial powers.  “The Palestinian people now look to South...

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Stamp duty giveaway will have limited impact, says Nationwide

Stamp duty giveaway will have limited impact, says Nationwide By Kevin Peachey Personal finance reporter 30 November 2017 From the section Business Image copyright PA The stamp duty concession for first-time buyers announced in the Budget will have a “limited impact” on housing demand, a lender has said. Stamp duty has been abolished when buying a first home up to a value of £300,000 in England, Northern Ireland and temporarily, at least, in Wales. For properties costing up to £500,000, no stamp duty will be paid on the first £300,000. The Nationwide said many buyers had already paid little...

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Study: Tougher Gun Laws Help Prevent Domestic Violence Deaths

THURSDAY, Nov. 30, 2017 (HealthDay News) — More stringent gun laws might spur a decline n domestic violence murders, new research suggests. Thirteen states and federal law prohibit people convicted of domestic violence from buying guns. But the study found that states that extended this ban to people convicted of any violent crime had 23 percent fewer domestic violence murders. The researchers also found that larger reductions in these deaths were seen when gun restriction laws included dating partners in addition to spouses or ex-spouses, and a requirement that abusers turn in their guns. “The evidence from this study and previous research highly suggests that firearm restrictions work to reduce intimate partner homicides, and that laws need to be comprehensive when we think about populations most at risk for committing intimate partner violence,” said study author April Zeoli. She is an associate professor of criminal justice at Michigan State University. In the study, the researchers analyzed 34 years of data (1980 to 2013) from 45 states. The 29 states with laws restricting guns in domestic violence cases when a restraining order had been issued had 9 percent fewer intimate partner murders, a finding similar to those in previous studies. Restraining orders for dating partners that include gun restrictions were present in 22 states and linked with a 10 percent decrease in romantic partner murders and a 14 percent reduction...

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Resistance to Popular Antibiotic Likely Began Years Before Human Use

THURSDAY, Nov. 30, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Bacterial resistance to the antibiotic ampicillin may have begun years before doctors started prescribing it in the early 1960s, a new study suggests. Ampicillin, a broad-spectrum penicillin, is widely used to treat many bacterial infections, including bladder and ear infections, pneumonia and gonorrhea. Resistance was likely triggered by overuse of penicillin in livestock in North America and Europe in the 1950s, according to researchers at the Pasteur Institute in Paris. Ampicillin was released on the market for humans in 1961. “Our findings suggest that antibiotic residues in farming environments such as soil, wastewater and manure may have a much greater impact on the spread of resistance than previously thought,” said study leader Dr. Francois-Xavier Weill, a researcher at the institute. Many bacteria that cause serious infections in people have developed resistance to antibiotics such as ampicillin. And annual worldwide deaths from antibiotic resistance are expected to top 10 million by 2050, the researchers said in background notes. Because of these concerns, the World Health Organization recently called for an end to routine antibiotic use in healthy livestock. The new findings were published Nov. 29 in The Lancet Infectious Diseases. While the study can’t identify a direct cause-and-effect relationship, Weill said it suggests that the nonclinical use of penicillin in livestock may have encouraged the evolution of resistance genes in the late 1950s....

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