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University Was Tipped Off To Possible Unauthorized Trials Of Herpes Vaccine

WASHINGTON — The university that employed a controversial herpes vaccine researcher has told the federal government it learned last summer of the possibility of his illegal experimentation on human subjects. But Southern Illinois University did not publicly disclose the tip or its findings about researcher William Halford’s misconduct for months, according to a memo obtained by Kaiser Health News. Last week, Kaiser Health News reported that Halford conducted an experiment in which he vaccinated patients in U.S. hotel rooms in 2013 without any safety oversight and in violation of U.S. laws, according to patients and emails they provided to...

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Intense Workouts May Boost Memory

TUESDAY, Nov. 28, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Pump up your workouts, pump up your memory, new research suggests. The study of 95 healthy young adults showed that six weeks of 20-minute bouts of interval training led to significant improvements in what’s called high-interference memory. An example of this type of memory is distinguishing your car from another of the same make and model. The Canadian scientists also found these workouts led to increases in a protein involved in the growth, function and survival of brain cells. The results were published in the November issue of the Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience. The findings could prove important as an aging population leads to higher rates of Alzheimer’s disease and other types of dementia, according to the researchers from McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario. “Improvements in this type of memory from exercise might help to explain the previously established link between aerobic exercise and better academic performance,” said study author Jennifer Heisz. She’s an assistant professor in the department of kinesiology at McMaster. “At the other end of our lifespan, as we reach our senior years, we might expect to see even greater benefits in individuals with memory impairment brought on by conditions such as dementia,” she added in a university news release. The researchers are now assessing how exercise and mental training affects high-interference memory in older adults. “One hypothesis is...

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Number of young people acting as ‘money mules’ doubles

Number of young people acting as ‘money mules’ doubles 27 November 2017 From the section UK Image copyright PA The number of young people caught acting as “money mules” has doubled in the past four years, according to the UK’s fraud prevention service, Cifas. A mule allows their bank account to be used by others to transfer money in and out of it, and in return, keep some of the money for themselves. The money to be laundered is likely to have come from drug smuggling, people trafficking and terrorism, experts say. If caught, money mules have their bank...

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From Horses to Humans: Uncovering a Clue to Sore Throats

MONDAY, Nov. 27, 2017 (HealthDay News) — The fight against germs that cause millions of sore throats each year may have gotten a boost from horses. Working in partnership, scientists from the Animal Health Trust, a veterinary and scientific research charity in the United Kingdom, and those from the Houston Methodist Research Institute in Texas identified new genes that help explain how the bacteria survive in people. Infections caused by the bacteria — Streptococcus pyogenes — have surged in the past two decades, according to the researchers. They say the bug is the culprit behind 600 million sore throats caused by inflammation each year, with infection often leading to invasive disease. It’s responsible for 100 million cases of scarlet fever, acute rheumatic fever and the flesh-eating disease necrotizing fasciitis, the researchers said. Still, they added, little has been known about the 1,800 genes in the bacteria that enable it to infect people’s throats. Normally, researchers must painstakingly investigate one gene at a time. However, the veterinary scientists in Britain discovered a way to simultaneously test all the genes of a close relative of Streptococcus pyogenes that affects horses. It’s called Streptococcus equi. They shared that technique with the Texas scientists, who then used it to examine the human variation of the bacteria. They pinpointed 92 genes the bacteria needs to grow in human saliva and replicated the initial stages...

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Bullied Teens More Likely to Take Weapons to School

MONDAY, Nov. 27, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Bullied teens are twice as likely to take weapons such as guns or knives to school, a new study reveals. Three factors were linked to greater odds of high school students carrying a weapon during school hours: fighting at school; being threatened or injured at school; and skipping school out of fear for their safety. “If kids were being bullied, but not in fear of their physical safety, then there was not an increased risk of carrying a weapon,” said lead researcher Dr. Andrew Adesman. He is chief of developmental and behavioral pediatrics at Cohen Children’s Medical Center of New York in New Hyde Park. However, “almost 50 percent of kids who felt all three threats carried a weapon,” Adesman said. School violence is a serious issue in the United States, with 45 reported school shootings in 2015 alone, the researchers said in background notes. Adesman’s team wanted to see how peer aggression might influence the likelihood of weapons-carrying. The researchers used data from the 2015 U.S. Youth Risk Behavior Survey on more than 15,600 teens in grades 9 through 12. The investigators focused on three types of weapons: guns, knives and clubs. The findings showed that slightly more than one in five students reported being bullied during the past year. Of these kids, a little more than 4 percent said they...

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