How do you move 250 elephants to their new home? Very carefully

by | Jul 14, 2022 | Top Stories

Enlarge this image

An elephant is hoisted into a transport vehicle at the Liwonde National Park in southern Malawi on Sunday.

Thoko Chikondi/AP

hide caption

toggle caption

Thoko Chikondi/AP

LIWONDE NATIONAL PARK, Malawi — A tranquilized baby elephant is hoisted into the air and gently placed in a large truck that will take it to a new home. One by one, 250 elephants are being moved from Malawi’s overcrowded Liwonde National Park to the much larger Kasungu park 380 kilometers (236 miles) away in the country’s north. The elephants are tracked in the park and darts are fired to sedate them. While in slumber they are moved into the large trucks that take them to Kusungu park. So far at least 40 elephants have been moved and the rest should go by the end of the month at a total cost of about $1.5 million to $2 million, according to officials. In addition, about 405 other wildlife, including buffalo, impala, sable, warthog and waterbuck will be moved to Kasungu. The entire process is a cooperation between Malawi’s Department of National Parks and Wildlife, the International Fund for Animal Welfare and African Parks.

Enlarge this image

An elephant is hoisted into a transport vehicle at the Liwonde National Park on Sunday.

Thoko Chikondi/AP

hide caption

toggle caption

Thoko Chikondi/AP

“This will establish viable elephant populations, and ensure the prosperity of local communities living around the parks. It will also alleviate habitat pressure and reduce human-wildlife conflict,” African Parks representative in Malawi Sam Kamoto said.

African Parks is a non-profit organization that manages and rehabilitates national parks in partnership with governments and local communities. The group currently manages 20 national parks and protected areas in 11 African countries, including Malawi.

Since 2015 Liwonde National Park has been managed by African Parks which found that its more than 600 elephants are threatening the park’s vegetation and biodiversity. Liwonde’s 548 square kilometers (211 square miles) of floodpla …

Article Attribution | Read More at Article Source

Share This