Why Iranian women are burning their hijabs after the death of Mahsa Amini

by | Sep 21, 2022 | Top Stories

Enlarge this image

A picture obtained by AFP outside Iran shows shows a demonstrator raising his arms and makes the victory sign in Tehran on Monday during a protest for Mahsa Amini, a woman who died after being arrested by the Islamic republic’s morality police.

AFP via Getty Images

hide caption

toggle caption

AFP via Getty Images

Iranian women are burning their hijabs and cutting their hair short in protests over the death of Mahsa Amini, a young woman who died after being arrested in Tehran by Iran’s notorious “morality police,” who enforce the country’s rules on hijabs and other conservative Islamic modes of dress and behavior. Here’s what we know so far about Amini’s death and the public furor it ignited, and the questions that remain: Amini was arrested for allegedly breaking hijab rules Amini, 22, died on Friday in northern Tehran. She had been arrested on Tuesday and reportedly was taken to a hospital shortly afterward. Amini suffered multiple blows to the head before she died, according to London-based broadcaster Iran International. Amini was arrested in her brother’s car during a visit to see family members in the capital, the outlet reported. She was originally from Saqqez in Kurdistan province. Her father says she was beaten to death in custody

Enlarge this image

People hold signs and chant slogans outside the Iranian Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey, on Wednesday during a protest over the death of Iranian Mahsa Amini.

Chris McGrath/Getty Images

hide caption

toggle caption

Chris McGrath/Getty Images

Amini’s family say officers beat her in the police van after her arrest, citing eyewitnesses who support that claim. Police reject the allegations, saying Amini died after being taken to a hospital because she had a heart attack.

Senior officials who are promising a full investigation include President Ebrahim Raisi, who called Amini’s family on Sunday to assure them her death would be investigated. “Your daughter is like my own daughter, and I feel that this incident happened to one of my loved ones,” he said. Iran’s chief justice, Mohseni Ejei, has also promised a full investigation. The United Nations called for a impartial inquiry into Amini’s death. “Mahsa Amini’s tragic death and allegations of torture and ill-treatment must be promptly, impartially and effectively investigated by an independent competent authority, that ensures, in particular, that her family has access to justice and truth,” acting U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights Nada Al-Nashif said in a statement. Laws that require women in Iran to cover their heads in public remain “of concern,” the U.N. said, adding that the morality police have recently stepped up street patrols. Protesters and government loyalists cite powerful images of Amini A photo of Amini lying comatose in a hospital is at the heart of a rallying cry for Iranians who want more freedoms and rights for women. The government has pointed to its own images to prove Amini wasn’t beaten in custody. Shortly after her death, Iranian police released surveillance camera footage of part of her arrest.
“The video shows the woman suddenly collapsing on a chair while she was talking by a female police in the police station,” according to state-run IRNA news agency. Critics want the morality police dismantled

Enlarge this image

A picture obtained by AFP outside Iran shows people gathering in Tehran on Monday during a protest for Mahsa Amini, a woman who died after being arrested by the Islamic republic’s morality police.

AFP via Getty Images

Article Attribution | Read More at Article Source

Share This