‘It feels empowering’ – South Africans vote in pivotal election

by | May 29, 2024 | Top Stories

Getty ImagesCopyright: Getty ImagesSouth Africans do not directly vote for a president. Instead they vote for MPs who will then go on to elect the president. The leader of the party that can muster a majority in the National Assembly is likely to become the next head of state. Here’s a brief overview of the main party leaders:Cyril Ramaphosa: South Africa’s current president and leader of the African National Congress (ANC), he’s running for a second term.The 71-year-old has a wide ranging CV. He’s a political veteran who helped Nelson Mandela negotiate an end to apartheid, but has also been a trade unionist, mine boss and business tycoon.Ramaphosa’s first term in office has been beset by issues such as high unemployment, widespread power cuts and corruption allegations. He promises to create millions of new jobs, end corruption and boost investment.John Steenhuisen: Heads South Africa’s second largest party, which makes him leader of the opposition.Along with his party, the liberal Democratic Alliance(DA), Steenhuisen wants greater privatisation. He has also pledged to end power cuts and halve the rate of violent crime.However, Steenhuisen faces the thorny issue of race. He’s a white man in a country where white people constitute just 7% of the population, yet hold a disproportionate amount of economic power. Thus, numerous commentators question whether South Africa is “ready” for a white president.Julius Malema: Leads South Africa’s third largest party, the radical Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF).His focus is on inequality and the ANC’s failure to sufficiently redistribute land from the white minority to the black majority. This stance, as well as his fiery speeches, has built Malema a considerable following of both poor black South Africans and young voters.The 43-year-old is also known for generating controversy, throughout his political career he has offended a wide range of people and been convicted twice for hate speech.Read more about these party leaders here: …

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[mwai_chat context=”Let’s have a discussion about this article:nnGetty ImagesCopyright: Getty ImagesSouth Africans do not directly vote for a president. Instead they vote for MPs who will then go on to elect the president. The leader of the party that can muster a majority in the National Assembly is likely to become the next head of state. Here’s a brief overview of the main party leaders:Cyril Ramaphosa: South Africa’s current president and leader of the African National Congress (ANC), he’s running for a second term.The 71-year-old has a wide ranging CV. He’s a political veteran who helped Nelson Mandela negotiate an end to apartheid, but has also been a trade unionist, mine boss and business tycoon.Ramaphosa’s first term in office has been beset by issues such as high unemployment, widespread power cuts and corruption allegations. He promises to create millions of new jobs, end corruption and boost investment.John Steenhuisen: Heads South Africa’s second largest party, which makes him leader of the opposition.Along with his party, the liberal Democratic Alliance(DA), Steenhuisen wants greater privatisation. He has also pledged to end power cuts and halve the rate of violent crime.However, Steenhuisen faces the thorny issue of race. He’s a white man in a country where white people constitute just 7% of the population, yet hold a disproportionate amount of economic power. Thus, numerous commentators question whether South Africa is “ready” for a white president.Julius Malema: Leads South Africa’s third largest party, the radical Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF).His focus is on inequality and the ANC’s failure to sufficiently redistribute land from the white minority to the black majority. This stance, as well as his fiery speeches, has built Malema a considerable following of both poor black South Africans and young voters.The 43-year-old is also known for generating controversy, throughout his political career he has offended a wide range of people and been convicted twice for hate speech.Read more about these party leaders here: …nnDiscussion:nn” ai_name=”RocketNews AI: ” start_sentence=”Can I tell you more about this article?” text_input_placeholder=”Type ‘Yes'”]
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