‘They leave boyfriends and girlfriends for war, and may never return’

by | May 23, 2024 | Top Stories

60 minutes agoQuentin Sommerville,Karenni State, Myanmar BBCIn Myanmar’s eastern Karenni State, the sleepy jungle town of Demoso has come alive with revolutionary fervour. In the burnt-red soil along the sides of the town’s main road, a transformation is under way. Newly made bamboo-and-wood-built shops and cafes have sprung up, and the talk in all of them is of one thing: resistance.For decades, ethnic groups here have fought the military leadership that has ruled the South East Asian nation. A transition to democracy was cut short by a military coup three years ago, and since then, the town has become a magnet for young fighters and activists.Robbed of their first taste of democratic freedom, they took to the streets and joined in acts of civil disobedience. They were met with violence and arrests.Many left Yangon and other major cities for this remote jungle outpost to join the insurgency that is sweeping across the countryside.In one new bar – Yangon Vibes – a long-haired rapper Novem Thu, 33, is on his second cocktail. Their specialty here is an electric blue margherita, but Novem Thu favours something darker. Around him the air buzzes with talk of the insurgents’ successes. “There is only Plan A, destroying the military. There is no Plan B,” Novem tells me. He isn’t a soldier but spends most of his time with the resistance on the front line. “My job is to motivate them,” he says. His music is blood-curdling, and he brandishes a weapon in his videos – a toy gun from his brother, he tells me.After sunset, Yangon Vibes pulls down blackout blinds over the bar’s bright lights, to avoid the military’s drones and war planes. This area …

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[mwai_chat context=”Let’s have a discussion about this article:nn60 minutes agoQuentin Sommerville,Karenni State, Myanmar BBCIn Myanmar’s eastern Karenni State, the sleepy jungle town of Demoso has come alive with revolutionary fervour. In the burnt-red soil along the sides of the town’s main road, a transformation is under way. Newly made bamboo-and-wood-built shops and cafes have sprung up, and the talk in all of them is of one thing: resistance.For decades, ethnic groups here have fought the military leadership that has ruled the South East Asian nation. A transition to democracy was cut short by a military coup three years ago, and since then, the town has become a magnet for young fighters and activists.Robbed of their first taste of democratic freedom, they took to the streets and joined in acts of civil disobedience. They were met with violence and arrests.Many left Yangon and other major cities for this remote jungle outpost to join the insurgency that is sweeping across the countryside.In one new bar – Yangon Vibes – a long-haired rapper Novem Thu, 33, is on his second cocktail. Their specialty here is an electric blue margherita, but Novem Thu favours something darker. Around him the air buzzes with talk of the insurgents’ successes. “There is only Plan A, destroying the military. There is no Plan B,” Novem tells me. He isn’t a soldier but spends most of his time with the resistance on the front line. “My job is to motivate them,” he says. His music is blood-curdling, and he brandishes a weapon in his videos – a toy gun from his brother, he tells me.After sunset, Yangon Vibes pulls down blackout blinds over the bar’s bright lights, to avoid the military’s drones and war planes. This area …nnDiscussion:nn” ai_name=”RocketNews AI: ” start_sentence=”Can I tell you more about this article?” text_input_placeholder=”Type ‘Yes'”]
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