Boeing’s Starliner spacecraft still doesn’t have a landing date, NASA says

by | Jun 28, 2024 | Science

NASA says Boeing Starliner will extend its first astronaut mission well into the summer after launching June 5 for what was supposed to be a 10-day flight.Starliner experienced both helium leaks and thruster issues during a June 6 docking with the International Space Station (ISS). The spacecraft is stable and rated to leave the ISS in case of emergency, Boeing and NASA leadership stress. But after testing the thrusters in space, NASA and Boeing said they want to take more time to understand the root cause.A test campaign will start as soon as July 2 at the White Sands Test Facility in New Mexico to replicate how the thrusters were used during the flight, NASA commercial crew program manager Steve Stich said during a livestreamed update today (June 28) with reporters. The testing will take approximately two weeks, but that depends on what is found — and more analysis will be required afterwards. As such, NASA and Boeing do not yet have a landing date for Starliner.”We’re not going to target a specific date until we get that testing completed, and we look at the fault tree, and then we understand the path for it,” Stich said.Related: Thruster glitches and helium leaks can’t stop Boeing’s Starliner astronaut test flight — but why are they happening?Starliner’s 10-day Crew Flight Test mission with NASA astronauts Butch Wilmore and Suni Williams, both former U.S. Navy test pilots, is a developmental mission that had flexibility built into it in case of the unexpected in spac …

Article Attribution | Read More at Article Source

[mwai_chat context=”Let’s have a discussion about this article:nnNASA says Boeing Starliner will extend its first astronaut mission well into the summer after launching June 5 for what was supposed to be a 10-day flight.Starliner experienced both helium leaks and thruster issues during a June 6 docking with the International Space Station (ISS). The spacecraft is stable and rated to leave the ISS in case of emergency, Boeing and NASA leadership stress. But after testing the thrusters in space, NASA and Boeing said they want to take more time to understand the root cause.A test campaign will start as soon as July 2 at the White Sands Test Facility in New Mexico to replicate how the thrusters were used during the flight, NASA commercial crew program manager Steve Stich said during a livestreamed update today (June 28) with reporters. The testing will take approximately two weeks, but that depends on what is found — and more analysis will be required afterwards. As such, NASA and Boeing do not yet have a landing date for Starliner.”We’re not going to target a specific date until we get that testing completed, and we look at the fault tree, and then we understand the path for it,” Stich said.Related: Thruster glitches and helium leaks can’t stop Boeing’s Starliner astronaut test flight — but why are they happening?Starliner’s 10-day Crew Flight Test mission with NASA astronauts Butch Wilmore and Suni Williams, both former U.S. Navy test pilots, is a developmental mission that had flexibility built into it in case of the unexpected in spac …nnDiscussion:nn” ai_name=”RocketNews AI: ” start_sentence=”Can I tell you more about this article?” text_input_placeholder=”Type ‘Yes'”]
Share This