Decades after the famed Kyrenia shipwreck’s discovery, researchers have a new estimate of when it sank

by | Jun 26, 2024 | Science

Sign up for CNN’s Wonder Theory science newsletter. Explore the universe with news on fascinating discoveries, scientific advancements and more.A lone diver first laid eyes on the ancient Kyrenia shipwreck off the north coast of Cyprus nearly 60 years ago. But when archaeologists attempted to determine the exact timeline of the vessel coming to a rest on the ocean floor, they were left to speculate based on the ship’s cargo.Now, a new study published Wednesday in the journal PLOS One may have a better time estimate of the Kyrenia’s demise — and the revelation came together thanks to newly cleaned wood samples from the ship, as well as clues provided by a twig, an animal bone and a cache of ancient almonds.Local diver Andreas Cariolou first discovered the Kyrenia ship, one of the first major Greek Hellenistic-period ships to be found largely intact, in 1965, and a team led by the late marine archaeologist Michael Katzev excavated the wreck and its cargo in the late ’60s.The researchers originally believed the vessel sank around 300 BC. One text, the first volume of the site’s final reports published in 2022, estimated a range of 294 BC to 290 BC, based on pottery and some coins found on board. But there was no scientific dating available to back up the estimates, according to the latest study. The authors of a new study dated almonds found aboard the Kyrenia ship to find a new estimated range of years for when the ancient vessel’s last voyage took place. – Kyrenia Ship ExcavationBy using radiocarbon dating — a method used to determine the age of organic materials, such as wood from trees — and dendrochronology, the science of dating tree rings, the researchers of the new study determined the Kyrenia’s sinking occurred between 296 BC and 271 BC. And they found a strong probability that it happened between 286 BC and 272 BC, the study authors wrote.“We got dates that are very close to those that archaeologists have been recently suggesting but just ever so slightly more recent,” said lead author Sturt Manning, distinguished professor of arts and sciences in classical archaeology at Cornell …

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[mwai_chat context=”Let’s have a discussion about this article:nnSign up for CNN’s Wonder Theory science newsletter. Explore the universe with news on fascinating discoveries, scientific advancements and more.A lone diver first laid eyes on the ancient Kyrenia shipwreck off the north coast of Cyprus nearly 60 years ago. But when archaeologists attempted to determine the exact timeline of the vessel coming to a rest on the ocean floor, they were left to speculate based on the ship’s cargo.Now, a new study published Wednesday in the journal PLOS One may have a better time estimate of the Kyrenia’s demise — and the revelation came together thanks to newly cleaned wood samples from the ship, as well as clues provided by a twig, an animal bone and a cache of ancient almonds.Local diver Andreas Cariolou first discovered the Kyrenia ship, one of the first major Greek Hellenistic-period ships to be found largely intact, in 1965, and a team led by the late marine archaeologist Michael Katzev excavated the wreck and its cargo in the late ’60s.The researchers originally believed the vessel sank around 300 BC. One text, the first volume of the site’s final reports published in 2022, estimated a range of 294 BC to 290 BC, based on pottery and some coins found on board. But there was no scientific dating available to back up the estimates, according to the latest study. The authors of a new study dated almonds found aboard the Kyrenia ship to find a new estimated range of years for when the ancient vessel’s last voyage took place. – Kyrenia Ship ExcavationBy using radiocarbon dating — a method used to determine the age of organic materials, such as wood from trees — and dendrochronology, the science of dating tree rings, the researchers of the new study determined the Kyrenia’s sinking occurred between 296 BC and 271 BC. And they found a strong probability that it happened between 286 BC and 272 BC, the study authors wrote.“We got dates that are very close to those that archaeologists have been recently suggesting but just ever so slightly more recent,” said lead author Sturt Manning, distinguished professor of arts and sciences in classical archaeology at Cornell …nnDiscussion:nn” ai_name=”RocketNews AI: ” start_sentence=”Can I tell you more about this article?” text_input_placeholder=”Type ‘Yes'”]
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