Record labels sue AI music generator startups Suno, Udio for copyright infringement

by | Jun 24, 2024 | Technology

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Music labels, including Universal Music Group (UMG), Sony Music Entertainment and Warner Music Group, have banded together to launch a lawsuit against AI music generation companies Suno and Udio for alleged copyright infringement, the most recent in a wave of litigation against the new tech.

Both Suno and Udio let users write text prompts to generate audio clips. 

The lawsuits, filed in New York and Boston in coordination with the Record Industry Association of America (RIAA), claim both companies copied songs and recordings generally without permission from record labels and ultimately distributed similar versions.

The 3 major record labels are suing AI music companies Suno and Udio. Here are the two lawsuits in full.– They accuse Suno & Udio of “willful copyright infringement on an almost unimaginable scale”– They provide evidence that both companies trained on their music, including…— Ed Newton-Rex (@ednewtonrex) June 24, 2024

VentureBeat has reached out to Udio and Suno for responses to the claims and will update when we hear back.

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Music label accusations against AI audio generators

UMG, Sony, and Atlantic Records — owned by Warner Music Group — claim in their complaint that Suno trained AI models using copyrighted music by downloading a digital version of a song and then generating similar-sounding music.

The labels say Suno generated “29 different outputs that contain the style of Johnny B. Goode,” a song owned by UMG.

The complaint states that when transcrib …

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Music labels, including Universal Music Group (UMG), Sony Music Entertainment and Warner Music Group, have banded together to launch a lawsuit against AI music generation companies Suno and Udio for alleged copyright infringement, the most recent in a wave of litigation against the new tech.

Both Suno and Udio let users write text prompts to generate audio clips. 

The lawsuits, filed in New York and Boston in coordination with the Record Industry Association of America (RIAA), claim both companies copied songs and recordings generally without permission from record labels and ultimately distributed similar versions.

The 3 major record labels are suing AI music companies Suno and Udio. Here are the two lawsuits in full.– They accuse Suno & Udio of “willful copyright infringement on an almost unimaginable scale”– They provide evidence that both companies trained on their music, including…— Ed Newton-Rex (@ednewtonrex) June 24, 2024

VentureBeat has reached out to Udio and Suno for responses to the claims and will update when we hear back.

Countdown to VB Transform 2024

Join enterprise leaders in San Francisco from July 9 to 11 for our flagship AI event. Connect with peers, explore the opportunities and challenges of Generative AI, and learn how to integrate AI applications into your industry. Register Now

Music label accusations against AI audio generators

UMG, Sony, and Atlantic Records — owned by Warner Music Group — claim in their complaint that Suno trained AI models using copyrighted music by downloading a digital version of a song and then generating similar-sounding music.

The labels say Suno generated “29 different outputs that contain the style of Johnny B. Goode,” a song owned by UMG.

The complaint states that when transcrib …nnDiscussion:nn” ai_name=”RocketNews AI: ” start_sentence=”Can I tell you more about this article?” text_input_placeholder=”Type ‘Yes'”]

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