Resting cuckoo bees win insect photo competition

by | Jun 24, 2024 | Climate Change

47 minutes agoLuke Chambers Sleeping cuckoos, by Yorkshire-based Luke Chambers, has won this year’s Royal Entomological Society Insect Week photography competition. Chambers’ photo shows two cuckoo bees resting on a blade of grass. “Finding any sleeping invertebrate is always brilliant – but two so close together, well that’s like winning the photography lottery,” he said.Tim JonasTim Jonas’s picture of caddis-fly larvae came second.Head judge, broadcaster, photographer and Falmouth University senior lecturer Dr Tim Cockerill said: “Insects are the most diverse group of animals on the planet yet we know so little about most of them. “Photography like this provides a window into the astonishing complexity and beauty of the insect world.”At a time when insects face huge threats, I hope this collection of stunning images helps to showcase just how important – and beautiful – they really are.”Gustav ParenmarkSwedish photographer Gustav Parenmark, 17, won the under-18 category, with this picture of a banded demoiselle damselfly at rest. “Waking up early is the key to photographing sleeping odonates,” he said.”This species of damselfly is usually very skittish – but I went out at 04:00 to capture them inactive, making them easier to photograph.”Jamie SmartJamie Smart’s picture of a robber fly came second.”I was up early one morning and decided to have a wander around our wild garden with my camera, when I saw this fly on grass,” the eight-year-old said. “I didn’t realise until looking on the computer that he was actually eating another fly.”Abi BattenAbi Batten gave her specially commended picture – taken using a smartphone – the title “A wasp joined us for tea”.Nikita RichardsonNikita Richardson’s Nature’s Jewels, of cotton harlequin bugs, was specially commended in the behaviour category. Thomas RobertsAn Orange-tip butterfly, by Thomas Roberts, caught the judges’ attention in the environment category.Leela ChannerLeela Channer’s picture of a Glanville fritillary butterfly was also commended.Panagiotis DalagiorgosPanagiotis Dalagiorgos’s photograph of a European mantis was commended in the portrait category.Robin BackhouseRobin Backhouse photographed this brightly coloured Picasso bug.Pete BurfordPete Burford’s picture is titled Look into my Eyes.All photographs courtesy Royal Entomological Society. …

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[mwai_chat context=”Let’s have a discussion about this article:nn47 minutes agoLuke Chambers Sleeping cuckoos, by Yorkshire-based Luke Chambers, has won this year’s Royal Entomological Society Insect Week photography competition. Chambers’ photo shows two cuckoo bees resting on a blade of grass. “Finding any sleeping invertebrate is always brilliant – but two so close together, well that’s like winning the photography lottery,” he said.Tim JonasTim Jonas’s picture of caddis-fly larvae came second.Head judge, broadcaster, photographer and Falmouth University senior lecturer Dr Tim Cockerill said: “Insects are the most diverse group of animals on the planet yet we know so little about most of them. “Photography like this provides a window into the astonishing complexity and beauty of the insect world.”At a time when insects face huge threats, I hope this collection of stunning images helps to showcase just how important – and beautiful – they really are.”Gustav ParenmarkSwedish photographer Gustav Parenmark, 17, won the under-18 category, with this picture of a banded demoiselle damselfly at rest. “Waking up early is the key to photographing sleeping odonates,” he said.”This species of damselfly is usually very skittish – but I went out at 04:00 to capture them inactive, making them easier to photograph.”Jamie SmartJamie Smart’s picture of a robber fly came second.”I was up early one morning and decided to have a wander around our wild garden with my camera, when I saw this fly on grass,” the eight-year-old said. “I didn’t realise until looking on the computer that he was actually eating another fly.”Abi BattenAbi Batten gave her specially commended picture – taken using a smartphone – the title “A wasp joined us for tea”.Nikita RichardsonNikita Richardson’s Nature’s Jewels, of cotton harlequin bugs, was specially commended in the behaviour category. Thomas RobertsAn Orange-tip butterfly, by Thomas Roberts, caught the judges’ attention in the environment category.Leela ChannerLeela Channer’s picture of a Glanville fritillary butterfly was also commended.Panagiotis DalagiorgosPanagiotis Dalagiorgos’s photograph of a European mantis was commended in the portrait category.Robin BackhouseRobin Backhouse photographed this brightly coloured Picasso bug.Pete BurfordPete Burford’s picture is titled Look into my Eyes.All photographs courtesy Royal Entomological Society. …nnDiscussion:nn” ai_name=”RocketNews AI: ” start_sentence=”Can I tell you more about this article?” text_input_placeholder=”Type ‘Yes'”]
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