RTX’s Collins in talks to drop ISS spacesuit contract with NASA, sources say

by | Jun 25, 2024 | Science

By Joey RouletteWASHINGTON (Reuters) -RTX Corp subsidiary Collins Aerospace is in talks with NASA to back out of its contract to build new spacesuits for astronauts on the International Space Station, a setback as the agency struggles with its decades-old spacewalking suits, according to two people familiar with the discussions.The contract was part of $3.5 billion NASA awarded to both Collins and Axiom Space in 2022 to build new spacesuits for the ISS and future moon missions. Collins got an initial $97 million under the program for ISS suit development, while it could vie with Axiom to get additional funds to work on lunar spacesuits.But Collins’ role in the program has been bumpy and development has fallen behind schedule, and the company has been in talks with NASA officials on how to wind down its role in the program, the two people said.”After a thorough evaluation, Collins Aerospace and NASA mutually agreed to descope Exploration Extravehicular Activity Services (xEVAS) task orders,” a Collins spokeswoman said in a statement, referring to the spacesuit contract.NASA did not immediately respond to a request for comment.The spacesuit woes add to a long history of difficulties NASA has faced in modernizing what are essentially human-shaped spacecraft – bulky, complex systems U.S. astr …

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[mwai_chat context=”Let’s have a discussion about this article:nnBy Joey RouletteWASHINGTON (Reuters) -RTX Corp subsidiary Collins Aerospace is in talks with NASA to back out of its contract to build new spacesuits for astronauts on the International Space Station, a setback as the agency struggles with its decades-old spacewalking suits, according to two people familiar with the discussions.The contract was part of $3.5 billion NASA awarded to both Collins and Axiom Space in 2022 to build new spacesuits for the ISS and future moon missions. Collins got an initial $97 million under the program for ISS suit development, while it could vie with Axiom to get additional funds to work on lunar spacesuits.But Collins’ role in the program has been bumpy and development has fallen behind schedule, and the company has been in talks with NASA officials on how to wind down its role in the program, the two people said.”After a thorough evaluation, Collins Aerospace and NASA mutually agreed to descope Exploration Extravehicular Activity Services (xEVAS) task orders,” a Collins spokeswoman said in a statement, referring to the spacesuit contract.NASA did not immediately respond to a request for comment.The spacesuit woes add to a long history of difficulties NASA has faced in modernizing what are essentially human-shaped spacecraft – bulky, complex systems U.S. astr …nnDiscussion:nn” ai_name=”RocketNews AI: ” start_sentence=”Can I tell you more about this article?” text_input_placeholder=”Type ‘Yes'”]
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