Satellite launches to keep an eye on space weather as solar activity ramps up

by | Jun 25, 2024 | Science

Sign up for CNN’s Wonder Theory science newsletter. Explore the universe with news on fascinating discoveries, scientific advancements and more.Forecasters will soon be able to see real-time mapping of lightning activity on Earth and keep a closer eye on solar storms unleashed by the sun thanks to a new weather satellite.Together, NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration launched GOES-U, or the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite U mission, on Tuesday.The weather satellite lifted off aboard a SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket from Kennedy Space Center in Florida at 5:26 p.m. ET. The launch streamed live on NASA’s website. Weather conditions in Florida were 60% favorable for a launch at the beginning of the launch window.GOES-U is the fourth, final satellite in the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites R Series, “the Western Hemisphere’s most sophisticated weather-observing and environmental-monitoring system,” according to NOAA.“The GOES-R series of satellites has been a game changer for us,” said Ken Graham, director of NOAA’s National Weather Service, during a Monday news conference. “Since the first launch of the series in 2016, the latest generation of GOES has enabled new and improved forecasts and warnings services to help save lives and protect property.” GOES-U launches from Kennedy Space Center on Tuesday afternoon. – NASA/YouTubeOnce GOES-U reaches a geostationary orbit, or a circular orbit above Earth’s equator, the satellite will be renamed GOES-19, or GOES East. The satellite will replace GOES-16, the former GOES East satellite launched in 2016, and work in tandem with GOES-18, also called GOES West. Meanwhile, the GOES-16 satellite will essentially become an on-orbit backup for the system in case one of the satellites goes down.Together, the GOES-18 and GOES-19 satellites will collect atmospheric, solar, climatic and ocean data and cover more than half the globe from the w …

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[mwai_chat context=”Let’s have a discussion about this article:nnSign up for CNN’s Wonder Theory science newsletter. Explore the universe with news on fascinating discoveries, scientific advancements and more.Forecasters will soon be able to see real-time mapping of lightning activity on Earth and keep a closer eye on solar storms unleashed by the sun thanks to a new weather satellite.Together, NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration launched GOES-U, or the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite U mission, on Tuesday.The weather satellite lifted off aboard a SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket from Kennedy Space Center in Florida at 5:26 p.m. ET. The launch streamed live on NASA’s website. Weather conditions in Florida were 60% favorable for a launch at the beginning of the launch window.GOES-U is the fourth, final satellite in the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites R Series, “the Western Hemisphere’s most sophisticated weather-observing and environmental-monitoring system,” according to NOAA.“The GOES-R series of satellites has been a game changer for us,” said Ken Graham, director of NOAA’s National Weather Service, during a Monday news conference. “Since the first launch of the series in 2016, the latest generation of GOES has enabled new and improved forecasts and warnings services to help save lives and protect property.” GOES-U launches from Kennedy Space Center on Tuesday afternoon. – NASA/YouTubeOnce GOES-U reaches a geostationary orbit, or a circular orbit above Earth’s equator, the satellite will be renamed GOES-19, or GOES East. The satellite will replace GOES-16, the former GOES East satellite launched in 2016, and work in tandem with GOES-18, also called GOES West. Meanwhile, the GOES-16 satellite will essentially become an on-orbit backup for the system in case one of the satellites goes down.Together, the GOES-18 and GOES-19 satellites will collect atmospheric, solar, climatic and ocean data and cover more than half the globe from the w …nnDiscussion:nn” ai_name=”RocketNews AI: ” start_sentence=”Can I tell you more about this article?” text_input_placeholder=”Type ‘Yes'”]
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