The gorgeous Ring Nebula makes a stunning skywatching sight this week

by | Jun 28, 2024 | Science

I would suppose that just about any good book on astronomy would contain a photograph of what might best be described as the “smoke ring” of the sky. Others might call it a doughnut or a cosmic bagel, but the popular name for this object is simply the Ring Nebula, located in the constellation of Lyra, the Lyre. Although generally considered a summer constellation, Lyra, it is still very well placed for viewing, now more than two weeks into the autumn season.Head outside this week at around 10 p.m. local daylight time and face due east. Approximately two-thirds of the way up from the horizon, you’ll spot a brilliant bluish-white star. This is Vega, the brightest star in Lyra. The only other star at that hour that outranks Vega in brightness is yellow-orange Arcturus in the constellation of Boötes, the Herdsman. But Arcturus will be at the opposite part of the sky, about halfway up in the southwest.The constellation of Lyra was supposed to represent Apollo’s harp. Six fainter stars form a little geometric pattern of a parallelogram attached at its northern corner to an equal-sided triangle. Vega gleams at the western part of the triangle. The two lowest stars in the parallelogram are Beta and Gamma Lyrae. Beta is sometimes also known as Sheliak and Gamma also goes by the name of Sulafat. Between these two stars, but a trifle nearer to Sulafat is where you will find the Ring Nebula.Want to see Ring Nebula or other nebulas for yourself? Be sure to check out our guid …

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[mwai_chat context=”Let’s have a discussion about this article:nnI would suppose that just about any good book on astronomy would contain a photograph of what might best be described as the “smoke ring” of the sky. Others might call it a doughnut or a cosmic bagel, but the popular name for this object is simply the Ring Nebula, located in the constellation of Lyra, the Lyre. Although generally considered a summer constellation, Lyra, it is still very well placed for viewing, now more than two weeks into the autumn season.Head outside this week at around 10 p.m. local daylight time and face due east. Approximately two-thirds of the way up from the horizon, you’ll spot a brilliant bluish-white star. This is Vega, the brightest star in Lyra. The only other star at that hour that outranks Vega in brightness is yellow-orange Arcturus in the constellation of Boötes, the Herdsman. But Arcturus will be at the opposite part of the sky, about halfway up in the southwest.The constellation of Lyra was supposed to represent Apollo’s harp. Six fainter stars form a little geometric pattern of a parallelogram attached at its northern corner to an equal-sided triangle. Vega gleams at the western part of the triangle. The two lowest stars in the parallelogram are Beta and Gamma Lyrae. Beta is sometimes also known as Sheliak and Gamma also goes by the name of Sulafat. Between these two stars, but a trifle nearer to Sulafat is where you will find the Ring Nebula.Want to see Ring Nebula or other nebulas for yourself? Be sure to check out our guid …nnDiscussion:nn” ai_name=”RocketNews AI: ” start_sentence=”Can I tell you more about this article?” text_input_placeholder=”Type ‘Yes'”]
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