When will the heat end? Never.

by | Jun 25, 2024 | Science

Summer is off to a sweltering start after multiple record-breaking heat events sent temperatures soaring for millions of people in the US.So when will it end?Forecasts for the coming weeks and months show exceptional heat is largely here to stay, with only fleeting periods of respite. And the sobering summer reality on a planet warming due to fossil fuel pollution is the heat isn’t going anywhere – it’s only going to get more frequent and intense as global temperatures rise.“Summers like the one we are experiencing now and the summer we had last year – which was the hottest on record – are going to become par for the course in the years ahead,” said Kristina Dahl, a climate scientist with the Union of Concerned Scientists.A sign of things to comeThere will still be colder-than-average summers in the future, but climate change is making it likelier more summers will end up hotter-than-average, Dahl told CNN. And the fingerprints of a changing climate are already visible, even before summer has reached its hottest months.This spring, hundreds of cities in the eastern half of the US experienced one of their 10 hottest Mays on record in what was another sign of a changing climate: dangerous heat seeping into typically cooler seasons.Early season heat waves add to the danger of what’s already the deadliest weather threat because the body can’t gradually acclimatize, or cope better with the heat, Dahl explained.Acclimation or not, the abnormally hot temperatures are also altering the perception of what’s hot. Temperatures through at least midweek will climb up to 10 degrees above normal in parts of the western and southern US, but that pales in comparison to last week’s roasting conditions.Summer should be hot, just not this hot: Parts of the central and eastern US sweltered through temperatures 25 or 30 degrees above normal last week. The heat was so extreme Caribou, Maine, a town just 10 miles from the Canadian border, hit 96 degrees, tying its all-time record high temperature.“This …

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[mwai_chat context=”Let’s have a discussion about this article:nnSummer is off to a sweltering start after multiple record-breaking heat events sent temperatures soaring for millions of people in the US.So when will it end?Forecasts for the coming weeks and months show exceptional heat is largely here to stay, with only fleeting periods of respite. And the sobering summer reality on a planet warming due to fossil fuel pollution is the heat isn’t going anywhere – it’s only going to get more frequent and intense as global temperatures rise.“Summers like the one we are experiencing now and the summer we had last year – which was the hottest on record – are going to become par for the course in the years ahead,” said Kristina Dahl, a climate scientist with the Union of Concerned Scientists.A sign of things to comeThere will still be colder-than-average summers in the future, but climate change is making it likelier more summers will end up hotter-than-average, Dahl told CNN. And the fingerprints of a changing climate are already visible, even before summer has reached its hottest months.This spring, hundreds of cities in the eastern half of the US experienced one of their 10 hottest Mays on record in what was another sign of a changing climate: dangerous heat seeping into typically cooler seasons.Early season heat waves add to the danger of what’s already the deadliest weather threat because the body can’t gradually acclimatize, or cope better with the heat, Dahl explained.Acclimation or not, the abnormally hot temperatures are also altering the perception of what’s hot. Temperatures through at least midweek will climb up to 10 degrees above normal in parts of the western and southern US, but that pales in comparison to last week’s roasting conditions.Summer should be hot, just not this hot: Parts of the central and eastern US sweltered through temperatures 25 or 30 degrees above normal last week. The heat was so extreme Caribou, Maine, a town just 10 miles from the Canadian border, hit 96 degrees, tying its all-time record high temperature.“This …nnDiscussion:nn” ai_name=”RocketNews AI: ” start_sentence=”Can I tell you more about this article?” text_input_placeholder=”Type ‘Yes'”]
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