American Hindu parents are finding innovative ways to pass the faith on to their kids

by | Jul 9, 2024 | Religion

(RNS) — Every day since March, 63-year-old Ranjani Saigal has posted a 90-second Instagram reel.“I’m not a social media person,” said Saigal, who goes by “The Hindu Grandma” on Instagram. “I didn’t know what a reel was, I didn’t know what TikTok was, any of that. Like many other grandparents, I was like, ‘Social media? I should stay away from that.’”
But Saigal, who lives in Boston, was determined to reach the next generation of Hindu children, and she knew social media is where she’d find them. Through short educational videos answering questions such as “Why do Hindus wear a bindi?” or demonstrating a step-by-step everyday morning prayer ritual, Saigal has become a symbolic “dadi,” “ajji,” or “ammamma” to over 100,000 followers. 
“Somehow people seem to like to learn from grandma, and hence seem to listen in more,” she said. “People love their grandmas, at the same time they’re kind of missing in their lives. And I don’t know, it touches me a lot, so it makes me keep wanting to go with it.”
To Saigal, who is a trained purohita, or family priest, and a Bharatanatyam teacher, Hinduism is a “star-studded, gem-filled” tradition that has a real power to connect with youth. For her granddaughter’s first b …

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[mwai_chat context=”Let’s have a discussion about this article:nn(RNS) — Every day since March, 63-year-old Ranjani Saigal has posted a 90-second Instagram reel.“I’m not a social media person,” said Saigal, who goes by “The Hindu Grandma” on Instagram. “I didn’t know what a reel was, I didn’t know what TikTok was, any of that. Like many other grandparents, I was like, ‘Social media? I should stay away from that.’”
But Saigal, who lives in Boston, was determined to reach the next generation of Hindu children, and she knew social media is where she’d find them. Through short educational videos answering questions such as “Why do Hindus wear a bindi?” or demonstrating a step-by-step everyday morning prayer ritual, Saigal has become a symbolic “dadi,” “ajji,” or “ammamma” to over 100,000 followers. 
“Somehow people seem to like to learn from grandma, and hence seem to listen in more,” she said. “People love their grandmas, at the same time they’re kind of missing in their lives. And I don’t know, it touches me a lot, so it makes me keep wanting to go with it.”
To Saigal, who is a trained purohita, or family priest, and a Bharatanatyam teacher, Hinduism is a “star-studded, gem-filled” tradition that has a real power to connect with youth. For her granddaughter’s first b …nnDiscussion:nn” ai_name=”RocketNews AI: ” start_sentence=”Can I tell you more about this article?” text_input_placeholder=”Type ‘Yes'”]
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