California and other parts of the West Coast hit with extreme heat wave

by | Jul 6, 2024 | Science

A dangerous heat wave imperiling people on the West Coast is expected to peak Saturday, but experts say the health risks will persist long after temperatures crest.“Widespread temperature records are expected to be tied or broken. Saturday will likely shape up to be the hottest day in this heatwave when high temperatures into the 110s will be common across California,” forecasters said in their nationwide update Friday. “The duration of this heat is also concerning as scorching above average temperatures are forecast to linger into next week.”Heat accumulates over time in people’s bodies, and the risk of a heart attack, heatstroke or other medical ailment often rises over time. Some experts said medical risks due to heat often trail behind the rise in temperatures — but spike as the days of risk add up.“Usually you see deaths from heat waves not from the first day, but on the second and third day,” said Dr. Lisa Patel, a clinical associate professor who practices as a pediatrician at Stanford Medicine Children’s Health. “The cumulative heat is a big risk factor, especially for the elderly and for chronic health conditions.”A farmworker operates a tractor (Mario Tama / Getty Images)In this case, the extreme heat is forecast to persist for more than a week without a break, grinding away at people’s resilience. The National Weather Service forecast on Friday called for record-breaking temperatures in California, Oregon and Washington on Saturday.In areas like the Sacramento Valley, where the heat wave has been centered, the National Weather Service put advisories in place on Tuesday morning at 11 a.m. Those advisories will last through next Tuesday, at least.“Early next week into next week there are hints of relief,” said Dakari Anderson, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in California’s capital city, adding that “relief will be a relative term” and temperatures could still be above 100 degrees in parts of the region.In the U.S. …

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[mwai_chat context=”Let’s have a discussion about this article:nnA dangerous heat wave imperiling people on the West Coast is expected to peak Saturday, but experts say the health risks will persist long after temperatures crest.“Widespread temperature records are expected to be tied or broken. Saturday will likely shape up to be the hottest day in this heatwave when high temperatures into the 110s will be common across California,” forecasters said in their nationwide update Friday. “The duration of this heat is also concerning as scorching above average temperatures are forecast to linger into next week.”Heat accumulates over time in people’s bodies, and the risk of a heart attack, heatstroke or other medical ailment often rises over time. Some experts said medical risks due to heat often trail behind the rise in temperatures — but spike as the days of risk add up.“Usually you see deaths from heat waves not from the first day, but on the second and third day,” said Dr. Lisa Patel, a clinical associate professor who practices as a pediatrician at Stanford Medicine Children’s Health. “The cumulative heat is a big risk factor, especially for the elderly and for chronic health conditions.”A farmworker operates a tractor (Mario Tama / Getty Images)In this case, the extreme heat is forecast to persist for more than a week without a break, grinding away at people’s resilience. The National Weather Service forecast on Friday called for record-breaking temperatures in California, Oregon and Washington on Saturday.In areas like the Sacramento Valley, where the heat wave has been centered, the National Weather Service put advisories in place on Tuesday morning at 11 a.m. Those advisories will last through next Tuesday, at least.“Early next week into next week there are hints of relief,” said Dakari Anderson, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in California’s capital city, adding that “relief will be a relative term” and temperatures could still be above 100 degrees in parts of the region.In the U.S. …nnDiscussion:nn” ai_name=”RocketNews AI: ” start_sentence=”Can I tell you more about this article?” text_input_placeholder=”Type ‘Yes'”]
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