Chris Mason: We stand on the threshold of a landmark election

by | Jul 2, 2024 | Politics

7 hours agoPA and ReutersThe general election campaign is all but over.In the last few weeks, recent precedent suggests up to one in five voters have already voted, by post.Tomorrow, it is the big moment for everyone else.It is six weeks to the day since Prime Minister Rishi Sunak got a drenching in Downing Street and this roadshow of persuasion began.So, what has changed, what hasn’t changed and what does this tell us about where we find ourselves?The stand-out fact at the heart of this campaign is that for all the noise and hullaballoo over the past month-and-a-half, the colossal gap in the opinion polls between Labour and the Conservatives has barely budged.Conservatives, from the top down, are braced for defeat – and a potentially catastrophic one at that.Labour, poll after poll after poll suggests, are miles ahead.Sir Keir Starmer and his Labour team have been quietly preparing for government, while wracked with a paranoia about complacency.Nothing the prime minister has attempted, both during his conventional time in office and then during this campaign, appears to have made much difference to his political fortunes.The Conservative Party is adept at chameleon-like reinvention – after all, we’ve seen a succession of Tory prime ministers defining themselves against the record of their immediate predecessor.But that strategy began to collide with its own contradictions.Was Rishi Sunak seeking to own the long Conservative stint in office, or distance himself from it?How many of the myriad challenges the UK faces could realistically be blamed on any other party?The past 14 years of Conservative-led government add up to a stint in office shaped by two referenda – Scottish independence and Brexit – and the international shocks of Covid and the war in Ukraine.The referenda recast our domestic politics and our relations with our nearest neighbours.PAOne propelled the Scottish National Party to unprecedented heights, altitude from which it expects to tumble tomorrow.The other – leaving the European Union – convulsed the continent, the country and, in particular, the Conservative Party, emboldening, chewing up and recasting the Tories in ways still visible now.The cast of Conservative MPs elected in 2019 was an improbable coalition, sent to Westminster by an electorate collectively desperate to see the Brexit impasse end and the UK’s departure from the EU delivered.That done, the Jenga-like combination of northern English Tories – many of whom wanted more state intervention in the economy – and traditional small-state Tories, often in the south, quickly proved very wobbly indeed under …

Article Attribution | Read More at Article Source

[mwai_chat context=”Let’s have a discussion about this article:nn7 hours agoPA and ReutersThe general election campaign is all but over.In the last few weeks, recent precedent suggests up to one in five voters have already voted, by post.Tomorrow, it is the big moment for everyone else.It is six weeks to the day since Prime Minister Rishi Sunak got a drenching in Downing Street and this roadshow of persuasion began.So, what has changed, what hasn’t changed and what does this tell us about where we find ourselves?The stand-out fact at the heart of this campaign is that for all the noise and hullaballoo over the past month-and-a-half, the colossal gap in the opinion polls between Labour and the Conservatives has barely budged.Conservatives, from the top down, are braced for defeat – and a potentially catastrophic one at that.Labour, poll after poll after poll suggests, are miles ahead.Sir Keir Starmer and his Labour team have been quietly preparing for government, while wracked with a paranoia about complacency.Nothing the prime minister has attempted, both during his conventional time in office and then during this campaign, appears to have made much difference to his political fortunes.The Conservative Party is adept at chameleon-like reinvention – after all, we’ve seen a succession of Tory prime ministers defining themselves against the record of their immediate predecessor.But that strategy began to collide with its own contradictions.Was Rishi Sunak seeking to own the long Conservative stint in office, or distance himself from it?How many of the myriad challenges the UK faces could realistically be blamed on any other party?The past 14 years of Conservative-led government add up to a stint in office shaped by two referenda – Scottish independence and Brexit – and the international shocks of Covid and the war in Ukraine.The referenda recast our domestic politics and our relations with our nearest neighbours.PAOne propelled the Scottish National Party to unprecedented heights, altitude from which it expects to tumble tomorrow.The other – leaving the European Union – convulsed the continent, the country and, in particular, the Conservative Party, emboldening, chewing up and recasting the Tories in ways still visible now.The cast of Conservative MPs elected in 2019 was an improbable coalition, sent to Westminster by an electorate collectively desperate to see the Brexit impasse end and the UK’s departure from the EU delivered.That done, the Jenga-like combination of northern English Tories – many of whom wanted more state intervention in the economy – and traditional small-state Tories, often in the south, quickly proved very wobbly indeed under …nnDiscussion:nn” ai_name=”RocketNews AI: ” start_sentence=”Can I tell you more about this article?” text_input_placeholder=”Type ‘Yes'”]
Share This