DoorDash delivers 100 million charity meals, partnering with religious, other nonprofits

by | Jul 8, 2024 | Religion

(RNS) — DoorDash is known for its food deliveries to homes across America.But it recently marked a milestone for a less visible aspect of its business: supporting faith-based groups and other nonprofits as they aid people who are facing hunger and poverty.
In June, DoorDash announced it had delivered more than 100 million charity meals via its Project DASH, which often involves drivers delivering 20 pounds of free food in boxes and bags to families in need.
Many of these partnerships began during the pandemic, when home delivery became an essential part of food aid and distribution for soup kitchens, food pantries and elder care — often run by religious organizations — and have continued in the years since.
From mass feedings of the homeless in Chicago to kosher market deliveries to needy New Yorkers to gift card distributions via Boston churches, faith leaders across the country have joined forces with the food delivery business to continue work they’ve long done in their communities, especially in areas where food is unaffordable or inaccessible.
Pastor Cornelius Parks, second from right, and Good Hope Freewill Baptist Church have partnered with DoorDash to better serve the community in Chicago. (Photo courtesy Cornelius Parks)
“As part of our work to empower local economies, we partner with faith leaders across the country to help broaden access in local communities,” said Darrell Davis, senior manager for public engagement for DoorDash, in a statement to Religion News Service.

RELATED: Pandemic boosted resilience, hurt financial health of Black churches, says report

“We’re excited to help our partners continue to achieve their community-focused missions in ways that break down barriers to access.”
Since 2021, the organization has offered gift cards — which it calls “community credits”— to nonprofits. It also has financially supported events ranging from turkey giveaways to faith-based activities such as vaccination efforts and mentoring programs.
With donations and deliveries from DoorDash, a Chicago pastor and his church helped feed hundreds of unhoused people in its fellowship hall on a special “Love Day” and sent free meals to the homes of seniors and veterans.
Pastor Cornelius Parks said the connections with the food delivery company have enhanced his church’s ability to reach out to the East Garfield Park neighborhood that he describes as a “food desert,” with scarce access to fresh food, grocery stores or mom-and-pop stores.
“If it wasn’t for DoorDash really partnering with us, a lot of things that we desire to do for the community probably wouldn’t come to pass because we’re limited on resources,” said Parks, the leader of Good Hope Freewill Baptist Church, a pred …

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[mwai_chat context=”Let’s have a discussion about this article:nn(RNS) — DoorDash is known for its food deliveries to homes across America.But it recently marked a milestone for a less visible aspect of its business: supporting faith-based groups and other nonprofits as they aid people who are facing hunger and poverty.
In June, DoorDash announced it had delivered more than 100 million charity meals via its Project DASH, which often involves drivers delivering 20 pounds of free food in boxes and bags to families in need.
Many of these partnerships began during the pandemic, when home delivery became an essential part of food aid and distribution for soup kitchens, food pantries and elder care — often run by religious organizations — and have continued in the years since.
From mass feedings of the homeless in Chicago to kosher market deliveries to needy New Yorkers to gift card distributions via Boston churches, faith leaders across the country have joined forces with the food delivery business to continue work they’ve long done in their communities, especially in areas where food is unaffordable or inaccessible.
Pastor Cornelius Parks, second from right, and Good Hope Freewill Baptist Church have partnered with DoorDash to better serve the community in Chicago. (Photo courtesy Cornelius Parks)
“As part of our work to empower local economies, we partner with faith leaders across the country to help broaden access in local communities,” said Darrell Davis, senior manager for public engagement for DoorDash, in a statement to Religion News Service.

RELATED: Pandemic boosted resilience, hurt financial health of Black churches, says report

“We’re excited to help our partners continue to achieve their community-focused missions in ways that break down barriers to access.”
Since 2021, the organization has offered gift cards — which it calls “community credits”— to nonprofits. It also has financially supported events ranging from turkey giveaways to faith-based activities such as vaccination efforts and mentoring programs.
With donations and deliveries from DoorDash, a Chicago pastor and his church helped feed hundreds of unhoused people in its fellowship hall on a special “Love Day” and sent free meals to the homes of seniors and veterans.
Pastor Cornelius Parks said the connections with the food delivery company have enhanced his church’s ability to reach out to the East Garfield Park neighborhood that he describes as a “food desert,” with scarce access to fresh food, grocery stores or mom-and-pop stores.
“If it wasn’t for DoorDash really partnering with us, a lot of things that we desire to do for the community probably wouldn’t come to pass because we’re limited on resources,” said Parks, the leader of Good Hope Freewill Baptist Church, a pred …nnDiscussion:nn” ai_name=”RocketNews AI: ” start_sentence=”Can I tell you more about this article?” text_input_placeholder=”Type ‘Yes'”]

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