Europe’s Ariane 6 rocket set for maiden flight after data glitch

by | Jul 9, 2024 | Science

By Tim Hepher and Joey RoulettePARIS (Reuters) -Europe’s Ariane 6 rocket was set to blast off for the first time on Tuesday, ending a year-long hiatus in the continent’s autonomous access to space after a last-minute data glitch.Pictures released by the European Space Agency showed the 56-metre rocket sitting on its launchpad in French Guiana, where officials described the latest weather status as “green”.”It looks very good. We have moderate risk of thunderstorms, but it’s getting better going into the (launch) window. So weather should not be a problem today,” Toni Tolker-Nielsen, ESA’s acting director of space transportation, told Reuters from the control room at Europe’s equatorial space port.The rocket was officially scheduled to lift off during a four-hour launch window starting at 3:00 p.m. (1800 GMT). The space agency said routine checks had shown a “small issue” in a data acquisition system, so the first hour of the launch window was lost and the earliest lift-off would be at 1900 GMT.The rocket’s nearly three-hour inaugural mission will not be a commercial flight but will carry a handful of satellites and experiments from European agencies, companies and universities.Final preparations were being carried out before handing over to computers around eight minutes before launch.”We are readying everyt …

Article Attribution | Read More at Article Source

[mwai_chat context=”Let’s have a discussion about this article:nnBy Tim Hepher and Joey RoulettePARIS (Reuters) -Europe’s Ariane 6 rocket was set to blast off for the first time on Tuesday, ending a year-long hiatus in the continent’s autonomous access to space after a last-minute data glitch.Pictures released by the European Space Agency showed the 56-metre rocket sitting on its launchpad in French Guiana, where officials described the latest weather status as “green”.”It looks very good. We have moderate risk of thunderstorms, but it’s getting better going into the (launch) window. So weather should not be a problem today,” Toni Tolker-Nielsen, ESA’s acting director of space transportation, told Reuters from the control room at Europe’s equatorial space port.The rocket was officially scheduled to lift off during a four-hour launch window starting at 3:00 p.m. (1800 GMT). The space agency said routine checks had shown a “small issue” in a data acquisition system, so the first hour of the launch window was lost and the earliest lift-off would be at 1900 GMT.The rocket’s nearly three-hour inaugural mission will not be a commercial flight but will carry a handful of satellites and experiments from European agencies, companies and universities.Final preparations were being carried out before handing over to computers around eight minutes before launch.”We are readying everyt …nnDiscussion:nn” ai_name=”RocketNews AI: ” start_sentence=”Can I tell you more about this article?” text_input_placeholder=”Type ‘Yes'”]
Share This