How to pull off an election all-nighter

by | Jul 3, 2024 | Health

3 hours agoGetty ImagesHello there election enthusiasts!I love the idea of a full night of election drama – sitting up in front of the television, the BBC News live page updating on my laptop, slowly converting a mountain of snacks into a wasteland of empty wrappers and mainlining unseemly quantities of tea. But we’re fighting biology here, fellow election-night crew.So I’ve been chatting to sleep experts to come up with the definitive guide to getting through the night and not becoming a sleep-deprived monster the next day. I’m going for the hardcore plan – we’ve got to be up all day Thursday whether that’s for work or childcare, then we’re watching the whole thing overnight and we’re back in the office on Friday. There’s a milder plan too (that we’ll discuss at the end) but all the tips here will help you see democracy in action.The four-nap planGetty ImagesIn an ideal world you need to be well-rested before you even get to Thursday night. There’s no such thing as “sleep banking” ahead of time but if you’re already wrecked then it’s going to be a struggle.The core of our plan is going to involve a solid nap strategy. Napping cannot replace the remarkable restorative power of a night’s sleep but it is scientifically proven to boost to alertness and concentration levels – essential for keeping up with the results.“If you’re staying up all night, I’d have a pre-emptive nap before it starts and have another in the middle of the night,” says Dr Allie Hare, a sleep medicine consultant at the Royal Brompton Hospital in London.Nap three is on Friday morning, pre-work or pre-school-run, to get us out of the door, and number four is in the middle of the day. “There’s a natural lull after lunch so that’s a good time to do it,” says Dr Hare.She thinks the “push through Friday” approach is best for most people in order to avoid completely disrupting their usual sleeping pattern.Pro tip: Pre-loaded napsNap technique is a delicate art. You’re aiming for 20-30 minutes in order to get a restorative boost, but go any longer and you’ll mess yourself up. “If you drop into a deeper sleep, coming out of that can leave you really groggy,” says Professor Russell Foster from the University of Oxford.It’s called sleep inertia – that feeling when you wake up worse than when you nodded off.Nap-pros have perfected the art of “pre-loading” and this comes expert-recommended.The idea is if you have a coffee immediately before your 20-minute nap (set a timer on your phone) and then the caffeine hits its peak j …

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[mwai_chat context=”Let’s have a discussion about this article:nn3 hours agoGetty ImagesHello there election enthusiasts!I love the idea of a full night of election drama – sitting up in front of the television, the BBC News live page updating on my laptop, slowly converting a mountain of snacks into a wasteland of empty wrappers and mainlining unseemly quantities of tea. But we’re fighting biology here, fellow election-night crew.So I’ve been chatting to sleep experts to come up with the definitive guide to getting through the night and not becoming a sleep-deprived monster the next day. I’m going for the hardcore plan – we’ve got to be up all day Thursday whether that’s for work or childcare, then we’re watching the whole thing overnight and we’re back in the office on Friday. There’s a milder plan too (that we’ll discuss at the end) but all the tips here will help you see democracy in action.The four-nap planGetty ImagesIn an ideal world you need to be well-rested before you even get to Thursday night. There’s no such thing as “sleep banking” ahead of time but if you’re already wrecked then it’s going to be a struggle.The core of our plan is going to involve a solid nap strategy. Napping cannot replace the remarkable restorative power of a night’s sleep but it is scientifically proven to boost to alertness and concentration levels – essential for keeping up with the results.“If you’re staying up all night, I’d have a pre-emptive nap before it starts and have another in the middle of the night,” says Dr Allie Hare, a sleep medicine consultant at the Royal Brompton Hospital in London.Nap three is on Friday morning, pre-work or pre-school-run, to get us out of the door, and number four is in the middle of the day. “There’s a natural lull after lunch so that’s a good time to do it,” says Dr Hare.She thinks the “push through Friday” approach is best for most people in order to avoid completely disrupting their usual sleeping pattern.Pro tip: Pre-loaded napsNap technique is a delicate art. You’re aiming for 20-30 minutes in order to get a restorative boost, but go any longer and you’ll mess yourself up. “If you drop into a deeper sleep, coming out of that can leave you really groggy,” says Professor Russell Foster from the University of Oxford.It’s called sleep inertia – that feeling when you wake up worse than when you nodded off.Nap-pros have perfected the art of “pre-loading” and this comes expert-recommended.The idea is if you have a coffee immediately before your 20-minute nap (set a timer on your phone) and then the caffeine hits its peak j …nnDiscussion:nn” ai_name=”RocketNews AI: ” start_sentence=”Can I tell you more about this article?” text_input_placeholder=”Type ‘Yes'”]
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