It’s been an election of disputed claims – BBC Verify has fact-checked them

by | Jul 2, 2024 | Politics

4 hours agoBy Ben Chu, BBC VerifyBBCBBC Verify has been fact-checking the political parties during this election campaign and seen some questionable claims at the forefront of the debate.If you are still making up your mind before heading to the polls, here is what you need to know about some of the potentially misleading statements the parties have made.Tories claim Labour spending would put taxes up by £2,000 per familyThis figure risks misleading people because it adds up four years of supposedly extra taxes resulting from Labour’s manifesto spending plans.It was asserted by Rishi Sunak 11 times in the first leaders’ debate and he has been using it on social media ever since.That is not what you would normally think of if somebody said your taxes were going up by £2,000 – you’d think they meant in a single year.The Office for Statistics Regulation has said “someone hearing the claim would have no way of knowing that this is an estimate summed together over four years”.The Conservatives also said the costings of Labour’s plans were worked out by impartial civil servants, but some are based on assumptions made by politically appointed special advisers. Labour disputes the figures. You can read more here. Labour claim Conservative spending would mean £4,800 extra on your mortgageThis figure – unveiled at a press conference by the shadow chancellor Rachel Reeves – is based on some questionable assumptions about how much the Conservatives would have to borrow if they won the election and the impact of this borrowing on Bank of England interest rates.It has been posted multiple times on Facebook and also posted on X by Keir Starmer and Rachel Reeves.The Conservatives say they will be able to pay for their planned tax cuts by saving £12bn a year from the welfare bill. Labour’s calculations assume they would make none of these savings at all, which is probably unrealistic.Also, the £4,800 figure is the supposed extra mortgage costs on a household added up over five years, not the cost falling in a single year, which risks misleading people.The statistics regulator has called for more context and transparency around how this figure was reached. You can read more here. Liberal Democrat bar chartsThe Liberal Democrats’ election literature has had a heavy emphasis on tactical voting in this election and, as in other years, has used a lot of bar charts.In one constituency in this campaign, a leaflet shows the party’s local vote share in 2010 and Labour’s share in 2017, two cherry picked years.The claim that “only the Liberal Democrats can beat the Conservatives here” is misleading. If they had selected 2019, then the chart would have shown the Lib Dems on 15.1% and Labour on 24.8%.The chart also misses out the vote share of the Conservatives who have actually held the seat since 2010.LibDemsThe Office for Statistics Regulation says “polling or election results data should be visualised in a way that does not mislead the average reader about the relative support for different parties”.Some Lib Dem campaign literature – as well as some produced by other parties in areas of the country – does not pass that test.Other leaflets have used local election results as a guide to the general election, which can be unreliable, or they have exaggerated the size of their bars in the chart to boost their apparent performance.You can read more here. Reform UK claims migrants in small boats could be returned to FrancePicking up small-boat migrants in the English Channel and returning them to France is a core Reform UK pledge. Party chairman Richard Tice has repeatedly claimed the UK is legally entitled to do this.But there is no evidence that this is the case.While international maritime laws allow a state to pick people up at sea if they are “in danger of being lost”, they do not allow them to …

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[mwai_chat context=”Let’s have a discussion about this article:nn4 hours agoBy Ben Chu, BBC VerifyBBCBBC Verify has been fact-checking the political parties during this election campaign and seen some questionable claims at the forefront of the debate.If you are still making up your mind before heading to the polls, here is what you need to know about some of the potentially misleading statements the parties have made.Tories claim Labour spending would put taxes up by £2,000 per familyThis figure risks misleading people because it adds up four years of supposedly extra taxes resulting from Labour’s manifesto spending plans.It was asserted by Rishi Sunak 11 times in the first leaders’ debate and he has been using it on social media ever since.That is not what you would normally think of if somebody said your taxes were going up by £2,000 – you’d think they meant in a single year.The Office for Statistics Regulation has said “someone hearing the claim would have no way of knowing that this is an estimate summed together over four years”.The Conservatives also said the costings of Labour’s plans were worked out by impartial civil servants, but some are based on assumptions made by politically appointed special advisers. Labour disputes the figures. You can read more here. Labour claim Conservative spending would mean £4,800 extra on your mortgageThis figure – unveiled at a press conference by the shadow chancellor Rachel Reeves – is based on some questionable assumptions about how much the Conservatives would have to borrow if they won the election and the impact of this borrowing on Bank of England interest rates.It has been posted multiple times on Facebook and also posted on X by Keir Starmer and Rachel Reeves.The Conservatives say they will be able to pay for their planned tax cuts by saving £12bn a year from the welfare bill. Labour’s calculations assume they would make none of these savings at all, which is probably unrealistic.Also, the £4,800 figure is the supposed extra mortgage costs on a household added up over five years, not the cost falling in a single year, which risks misleading people.The statistics regulator has called for more context and transparency around how this figure was reached. You can read more here. Liberal Democrat bar chartsThe Liberal Democrats’ election literature has had a heavy emphasis on tactical voting in this election and, as in other years, has used a lot of bar charts.In one constituency in this campaign, a leaflet shows the party’s local vote share in 2010 and Labour’s share in 2017, two cherry picked years.The claim that “only the Liberal Democrats can beat the Conservatives here” is misleading. If they had selected 2019, then the chart would have shown the Lib Dems on 15.1% and Labour on 24.8%.The chart also misses out the vote share of the Conservatives who have actually held the seat since 2010.LibDemsThe Office for Statistics Regulation says “polling or election results data should be visualised in a way that does not mislead the average reader about the relative support for different parties”.Some Lib Dem campaign literature – as well as some produced by other parties in areas of the country – does not pass that test.Other leaflets have used local election results as a guide to the general election, which can be unreliable, or they have exaggerated the size of their bars in the chart to boost their apparent performance.You can read more here. Reform UK claims migrants in small boats could be returned to FrancePicking up small-boat migrants in the English Channel and returning them to France is a core Reform UK pledge. Party chairman Richard Tice has repeatedly claimed the UK is legally entitled to do this.But there is no evidence that this is the case.While international maritime laws allow a state to pick people up at sea if they are “in danger of being lost”, they do not allow them to …nnDiscussion:nn” ai_name=”RocketNews AI: ” start_sentence=”Can I tell you more about this article?” text_input_placeholder=”Type ‘Yes'”]
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