KFF Health News’ ‘What the Health?’: SCOTUS Term Wraps With a Bang

by | Jul 3, 2024 | Health

The Host

It was a busy year for health-related cases at the Supreme Court. Among other issues, the justices grappled with two abortion cases, a separate case touching on the opioid epidemic, and a case challenging whether localities can bar homeless people from sleeping in public spaces. Also, the court struck down a decades-old precedent that could dramatically change how the federal government oversees health care and other types of policy.

In this special episode of “What the Health?”, Sarah Somers, legal director of the National Health Law Program, joins KFF Health News’ chief Washington correspondent, Julie Rovner, to discuss how the justices disposed of the term’s health-related cases and what those decisions could mean going forward.

A Summary of the Cases

On the functioning of government:

Loper Bright Enterprises v. Raimondo, challenging the “Chevron doctrine” that required courts to defer in most cases to the expertise of federal agencies in interpreting laws passed by Congress.

Corner Post Inc. v. Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, challenging the statute of limitations for bringing a case against a federal agency’s actions.

On abortion:

Food and Drug Administration v. Alliance for Hippocratic Medicine, challenging the FDA’s approval of the abortion pill mifepristone.

Moyle v. United States and Idaho v. United States, about whether the federal Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act requirement that hospitals participating in Medicare provide the care needed to stabilize a patient’s condition overrides Idaho’s near-complete abortion ban when a pregnant patient experiences a medical emergency.

On other health issues:

Harrington v. Purdue Pharma, about whether federal bankruptcy law can shield an entity from future claims without the consent of all claimants.

City of Grants Pass v. Johnson, about whether banning sleeping in public subjects those with no other place to sleep to “cruel and unusual punishment” under the U.S. Constitution.

Previous “What the Health?” coverage of these cases:

click to open the transcript

Transcript: SCOTUS Term Wraps With a Bang

KFF Health News’ ‘What the Health?’Episode Title: ‘SCOTUS Term Wraps With a Bang’Episode Number: 354Published: July 3, 2024

[Editor’s note: This transcript was generated using both transcription software and a human’s light touch. It has been edited for style and clarity.] 

Mila Atmos: The future of America is in your hands. This is not a movie trailer and it’s not a political ad, but it is a call to action. I’m Mila Atmos and I’m passionate about unlocking the power of everyday citizens. On our podcast “Future Hindsight,” we take big ideas about civic life and democracy and turn them into action items for you and me. …

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The Host

It was a busy year for health-related cases at the Supreme Court. Among other issues, the justices grappled with two abortion cases, a separate case touching on the opioid epidemic, and a case challenging whether localities can bar homeless people from sleeping in public spaces. Also, the court struck down a decades-old precedent that could dramatically change how the federal government oversees health care and other types of policy.

In this special episode of “What the Health?”, Sarah Somers, legal director of the National Health Law Program, joins KFF Health News’ chief Washington correspondent, Julie Rovner, to discuss how the justices disposed of the term’s health-related cases and what those decisions could mean going forward.

A Summary of the Cases

On the functioning of government:

Loper Bright Enterprises v. Raimondo, challenging the “Chevron doctrine” that required courts to defer in most cases to the expertise of federal agencies in interpreting laws passed by Congress.

Corner Post Inc. v. Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, challenging the statute of limitations for bringing a case against a federal agency’s actions.

On abortion:

Food and Drug Administration v. Alliance for Hippocratic Medicine, challenging the FDA’s approval of the abortion pill mifepristone.

Moyle v. United States and Idaho v. United States, about whether the federal Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act requirement that hospitals participating in Medicare provide the care needed to stabilize a patient’s condition overrides Idaho’s near-complete abortion ban when a pregnant patient experiences a medical emergency.

On other health issues:

Harrington v. Purdue Pharma, about whether federal bankruptcy law can shield an entity from future claims without the consent of all claimants.

City of Grants Pass v. Johnson, about whether banning sleeping in public subjects those with no other place to sleep to “cruel and unusual punishment” under the U.S. Constitution.

Previous “What the Health?” coverage of these cases:

click to open the transcript

Transcript: SCOTUS Term Wraps With a Bang

KFF Health News’ ‘What the Health?’Episode Title: ‘SCOTUS Term Wraps With a Bang’Episode Number: 354Published: July 3, 2024

[Editor’s note: This transcript was generated using both transcription software and a human’s light touch. It has been edited for style and clarity.] 

Mila Atmos: The future of America is in your hands. This is not a movie trailer and it’s not a political ad, but it is a call to action. I’m Mila Atmos and I’m passionate about unlocking the power of everyday citizens. On our podcast “Future Hindsight,” we take big ideas about civic life and democracy and turn them into action items for you and me. …nnDiscussion:nn” ai_name=”RocketNews AI: ” start_sentence=”Can I tell you more about this article?” text_input_placeholder=”Type ‘Yes'”]

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