Parties hammer home key messages as polling day nears

by | Jul 1, 2024 | Politics

2 hours agoBy Henry Zeffman, @hzeffman, Chief political correspondent BBCThere’s just three days to go until this general election campaign draws to a close and the fate of Britain’s leading politicians passes to the voters.This is not a moment where the scope of the campaign suddenly widens. Instead it narrows as the parties – especially the two main parties – hone in on the core messages they hope will appeal to the crucial slices of the British public they need to win.If you hear Rishi Sunak or Sir Keir Starmer say something today, expect to hear them say it tomorrow and on Wednesday too. This is not a time for variation but for repetition.So what are those messages? Well, Mr Sunak believes he will still be prime minister by the end of the week. At least that’s what he told Laura Kuenssberg yesterday.Look at the Conservative campaign as it enters the home stretch, though, and it is undeniably crouched in a defensive posture. It is hard to believe that when Prime Minister Sunak walked into the Downing Street rain 40 days ago to announce this general election that he anticipated spending the final three days of the campaign warning of a Labour victory so large that Sir Keir might wield “unchecked” power.Whatever they say publicly, the way the Conservatives are approaching this week shows that they believe the dire opinion polling is plausible at the very least.Campaigning in the Midlands today Mr Sunak is warning that, whatever Nigel Farage claims, Reform UK cannot hope to be the true opposition because they “just won’t win enough votes to oppose Labour”. He is expected to say: “Just imagine that – hundreds and hundreds of Labour MPs opposed by just one, two, three, four, five elected [Reform] MPs.”Note that this argument takes as a given that there will be hundreds and hundreds of Labour MPs.That assumption speaks to the complica …

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[mwai_chat context=”Let’s have a discussion about this article:nn2 hours agoBy Henry Zeffman, @hzeffman, Chief political correspondent BBCThere’s just three days to go until this general election campaign draws to a close and the fate of Britain’s leading politicians passes to the voters.This is not a moment where the scope of the campaign suddenly widens. Instead it narrows as the parties – especially the two main parties – hone in on the core messages they hope will appeal to the crucial slices of the British public they need to win.If you hear Rishi Sunak or Sir Keir Starmer say something today, expect to hear them say it tomorrow and on Wednesday too. This is not a time for variation but for repetition.So what are those messages? Well, Mr Sunak believes he will still be prime minister by the end of the week. At least that’s what he told Laura Kuenssberg yesterday.Look at the Conservative campaign as it enters the home stretch, though, and it is undeniably crouched in a defensive posture. It is hard to believe that when Prime Minister Sunak walked into the Downing Street rain 40 days ago to announce this general election that he anticipated spending the final three days of the campaign warning of a Labour victory so large that Sir Keir might wield “unchecked” power.Whatever they say publicly, the way the Conservatives are approaching this week shows that they believe the dire opinion polling is plausible at the very least.Campaigning in the Midlands today Mr Sunak is warning that, whatever Nigel Farage claims, Reform UK cannot hope to be the true opposition because they “just won’t win enough votes to oppose Labour”. He is expected to say: “Just imagine that – hundreds and hundreds of Labour MPs opposed by just one, two, three, four, five elected [Reform] MPs.”Note that this argument takes as a given that there will be hundreds and hundreds of Labour MPs.That assumption speaks to the complica …nnDiscussion:nn” ai_name=”RocketNews AI: ” start_sentence=”Can I tell you more about this article?” text_input_placeholder=”Type ‘Yes'”]
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