Scientists tap into 2 new quantum methods to catch dark matter suspects

by | Jul 4, 2024 | Science

The hunt for dark matter is about to get much cooler. Scientists are developing supercold quantum technology to hunt for the universe’s most elusive and mysterious stuff, which currently constitutes one of science’s biggest mysteries.Despite the fact that dark matter outnumbers the amount of ordinary matter in our universe by about six times, scientists don’t know what it is. That’s at least partly because no experiment devised by humanity has ever been able to detect it.To tackle this conundrum, scientists from several universities across the U.K. have united as a team to build two of the most sensitive dark matter detectors ever envisioned. Each experiment will hunt for a different hypothetical particle that could comprise dark matter. Though they have some of the same qualities, the particles also have some radically different characteristics, thus requiring different detection techniques.The equipment used in both experiments is so sensitive that the components have to be chilled to a thousandth of a degree above absolute zero, the theoretical and unreachable temperature at which all atomic movement would cease. This cooling must happen to prevent interference, or “noise,” from the world corrupting measurements.Related: ‘Immortal stars’ could feast on dark matter in the Milky Way’s heart”We are using quantum technologies at ultra-low temperatures to build the most sensitive detectors to date,” team member Samuli Autti from Lancaster University said in a statement. “The goal is to observe this mysterious matter directly in the laboratory and solve one of the greatest enigmas in science.”How dark matter has left scientists out in the coldDark matter poses a major issue for scientists because, despite making up about 80% to 85% of the u …

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[mwai_chat context=”Let’s have a discussion about this article:nnThe hunt for dark matter is about to get much cooler. Scientists are developing supercold quantum technology to hunt for the universe’s most elusive and mysterious stuff, which currently constitutes one of science’s biggest mysteries.Despite the fact that dark matter outnumbers the amount of ordinary matter in our universe by about six times, scientists don’t know what it is. That’s at least partly because no experiment devised by humanity has ever been able to detect it.To tackle this conundrum, scientists from several universities across the U.K. have united as a team to build two of the most sensitive dark matter detectors ever envisioned. Each experiment will hunt for a different hypothetical particle that could comprise dark matter. Though they have some of the same qualities, the particles also have some radically different characteristics, thus requiring different detection techniques.The equipment used in both experiments is so sensitive that the components have to be chilled to a thousandth of a degree above absolute zero, the theoretical and unreachable temperature at which all atomic movement would cease. This cooling must happen to prevent interference, or “noise,” from the world corrupting measurements.Related: ‘Immortal stars’ could feast on dark matter in the Milky Way’s heart”We are using quantum technologies at ultra-low temperatures to build the most sensitive detectors to date,” team member Samuli Autti from Lancaster University said in a statement. “The goal is to observe this mysterious matter directly in the laboratory and solve one of the greatest enigmas in science.”How dark matter has left scientists out in the coldDark matter poses a major issue for scientists because, despite making up about 80% to 85% of the u …nnDiscussion:nn” ai_name=”RocketNews AI: ” start_sentence=”Can I tell you more about this article?” text_input_placeholder=”Type ‘Yes'”]
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