The Fed may soon cut interest rates. That could make your next trip abroad more expensive

by | Jul 10, 2024 | Financial

SeongJoon Cho/Bloomberg via Getty ImagesThe U.S. Federal Reserve may start cutting interest rates before year’s end. That could make future trips abroad more expensive for the nation’s travelers.That’s due to how interest-rate policy affects the strength of the U.S. dollar.Here’s the basic idea: An environment of rising U.S. interest rates relative to those in other nations is generally “dollar positive,” said Jonathan Petersen, senior markets economist and foreign exchange specialist at Capital Economics.In other words, rising rates underpin a stronger U.S. dollar versus foreign currencies. Americans can buy more stuff with their money overseas.The opposite dynamic — falling interest rates — tends to be “dollar negative,” Petersen said. A weaker dollar means Americans can buy less abroad.Fed officials in June signaled they expect to cut rates once in 2024 and four additional times in 2025.”Our expectation for now is the dollar will come under more pressure next year,” Petersen said.However, that’s not necessarily a foregone conclusion. Some financial experts think the dollar’s strength may have staying power.”There have been quite a few headlines calling for the U.S. dollar’s demise,” Richard Madigan, chief investment officer at J.P. Morgan Private Bank, wrote in a recent note. “I continue to believe the dollar remains the one-eyed man in the land of the blind.”Why the U.S. dollar gives a ‘discount’ overseasThe Fed started raising interest rates aggressively in March 2022 to tame high pandemic-era inflation. By July 2023, the central bank had raised rates to their highest level in 23 years.The dollar’s strength surged against that backdrop.The Nominal Broad U.S. Dollar Index is higher than at any pre-pandemic point dating to at least 2006, when the central bank started tracking such data. The index gauges the dollar’s appreciation relative to currencies of the nation’s main trading partners such as the euro, the Canadian dollar and the Japanese yen.More from Personal Finance:What Taylor Swift’s The Eras Tour says about ‘passion tourism’Is inflation Biden’s or Trump’s fault? The answer isn’t so simpleWhy more Americans are struggling even as inflation coolsFor example, in July 2022, the U.S. dollar reached parity with the euro for the first time in 20 years …

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[mwai_chat context=”Let’s have a discussion about this article:nnSeongJoon Cho/Bloomberg via Getty ImagesThe U.S. Federal Reserve may start cutting interest rates before year’s end. That could make future trips abroad more expensive for the nation’s travelers.That’s due to how interest-rate policy affects the strength of the U.S. dollar.Here’s the basic idea: An environment of rising U.S. interest rates relative to those in other nations is generally “dollar positive,” said Jonathan Petersen, senior markets economist and foreign exchange specialist at Capital Economics.In other words, rising rates underpin a stronger U.S. dollar versus foreign currencies. Americans can buy more stuff with their money overseas.The opposite dynamic — falling interest rates — tends to be “dollar negative,” Petersen said. A weaker dollar means Americans can buy less abroad.Fed officials in June signaled they expect to cut rates once in 2024 and four additional times in 2025.”Our expectation for now is the dollar will come under more pressure next year,” Petersen said.However, that’s not necessarily a foregone conclusion. Some financial experts think the dollar’s strength may have staying power.”There have been quite a few headlines calling for the U.S. dollar’s demise,” Richard Madigan, chief investment officer at J.P. Morgan Private Bank, wrote in a recent note. “I continue to believe the dollar remains the one-eyed man in the land of the blind.”Why the U.S. dollar gives a ‘discount’ overseasThe Fed started raising interest rates aggressively in March 2022 to tame high pandemic-era inflation. By July 2023, the central bank had raised rates to their highest level in 23 years.The dollar’s strength surged against that backdrop.The Nominal Broad U.S. Dollar Index is higher than at any pre-pandemic point dating to at least 2006, when the central bank started tracking such data. The index gauges the dollar’s appreciation relative to currencies of the nation’s main trading partners such as the euro, the Canadian dollar and the Japanese yen.More from Personal Finance:What Taylor Swift’s The Eras Tour says about ‘passion tourism’Is inflation Biden’s or Trump’s fault? The answer isn’t so simpleWhy more Americans are struggling even as inflation coolsFor example, in July 2022, the U.S. dollar reached parity with the euro for the first time in 20 years …nnDiscussion:nn” ai_name=”RocketNews AI: ” start_sentence=”Can I tell you more about this article?” text_input_placeholder=”Type ‘Yes'”]
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