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Twitter’s emoji for Trump’s North Korea nuclear summit is very weird

As U.S. President Trump preps for a historic meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, Twitter doesn’t want you to forget to tweet about it under the right hashtag. In a choice that seems to make light of a lot of really quite serious things at once, Twitter is promoting its new #TrumpKimSummit emoji for Tuesday’s summit in Singapore. US President @realdonaldtrump will meet North Korea Chairman Kim Jong-un on 12 June in Singapore. Tweet with these hashtags to unlock a special #TrumpKimSummit emoji. pic.twitter.com/THa3IRlnTi — Twitter Government (@TwitterGov) June 10, 2018 The event-specific symbol features what appears to be a high-five between a hand representing the U.S. president and one representing the North Korean dictator known for executing his political enemies and exiling large swaths of his nation to prison camps, where they face starvation and torture. Presumably they are high-fiving over the successful but by no means guaranteed or likely negotiation of an extremely delicate denuclearization agreement and the deescalated international threat of the mass loss of life through nuclear annihilation. The summit won’t be Trump’s first foray into treating an established despot and human rights abuser like or perhaps better than the leader of an allied nation, though it is Twitter’s first time treating such an event like a Game of Thrones season finale. Twitter’s event-specific emojis, sometimes called hashflags, are usually reserved for things like Coca-Cola...

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Facebook still wants to be a media company

Facebook may have disbanded its “Trending” news section, but the social network is not abandoning its media company ambitions, despite whatever CEO Mark Zuckerberg said to Congress. In fact, the opposite of “not being a media business” is now occurring: Facebook is directly paying news publishers to create video, even as it claims its focus is on you and your “time well spent” on its site. Sorry, Facebook, but you can no longer claim you’re just a platform, just a technology enabler, when you are directly funding journalism. And you can’t claim you care about our time when you’re funding...

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Uber applies for patent that would detect drunk passengers

While Uber has changed the way that many think about transportation, it’s also changed the way that many drunk people find their way home at night. Rather than haphazardly hailing a cab or driving home under the influence, Uber provides a relatively safer way to get from point A to B on an indulgent evening. The company has been curious about its drunk users, applying for a patent with the United States Patent and Trademark Office for a system that would use machine learning to determine the ‘state’ of a passenger. While the patent limits itself to a dry discussion of ‘user state,’ it seems that what Uber is really interested in is detecting the difference between users of sound mind and users who are under the influence. CNN first spotted the patent, which describes a method of measuring the user’s behavior on their phone against their usual behavior, using information like location, data input accuracy, data input speed, interface interaction behavior, the angle at which the user is holding their device, or even the speed at which they’re walking. The patent also describes a system that would notify drivers of the passenger’s ‘state’, theoretically letting them prepare for the adventure ahead. The patent says that riders in a particularly unusual state may be matched with drivers who have special training or expertise, or may not be provided service...

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No Safety Concerns With DTaP Combo Vaccine for Kids: Study

FRIDAY, June 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) — A comprehensive, nearly two-decades long study of the DTaP vaccine that’s routinely given to babies and young children finds no safety issues. “No new or unexpected adverse events were detected” with use of the diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis (DTaP) shot over 19 years of follow-up, concluded a team led by Dr. Pedro Moro, of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The shot protects against three potentially serious infectious diseases of childhood, including whooping cough (pertussis). In recent years, the “anti-vaxxer” movement — a small minority of parents — has raised concerns that routine childhood immunizations might carry long-term health risks for kids. These concerns persist despite numerous studies showing no link between childhood vaccines and conditions such as autoimmune dysfunction or autism. The latest study seems to add to that body of evidence. Moro’s team focused on the DTaP vaccine, which is routinely advised as a five-dose series given at ages 2 months, 4 months, 6 months, 15 to 18 months and then again between the ages of 4 and 6 years. Millions of U.S. children have received the DTaP vaccine, and the CDC team looked through about 50,000 “adverse effect” reports tied to the shot. The investigators noted that the shot was given concurrently with other vaccines about 88 percent of the time. The vast majority of incidents reported were swelling...

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With The Rise Of Legal Weed, Drug Education Moves From ‘Don’t’ to ‘Delay’

California legalized marijuana in 2016, and this past New Year’s Eve eager customers lined up in the darkness outside medical marijuana dispensaries across the state, ready to start shopping at the stroke of midnight. The effect has gone beyond the cannabis cash register. Everyone has seen the ads or heard the chatter — and that includes minors, though marijuana remains illegal for those under 21. “Coming out of SFO [San Francisco] airport, there are billboards for Eaze [a weed delivery service] that say ‘Marijuana is here,’” said Danielle Ramo, a psychologist who conducts research at University of California-San Francisco on adolescent drug use. “I’m not sure parents were expecting to see so many images of cannabis all over.” The rollout of legal recreational marijuana in California and other states doesn’t appear to have led to any big changes in substance abuse prevention yet. But drug prevention education in schools has evolved significantly since the “Just Say No” days of the ’80s — and now typically takes an approach that’s more appropriate for the era of ubiquitous weed access. It’s one that emphasizes decision-making and critical thinking skills instead of abstinence. One approach is the Being Adept curriculum — an evidence-based course of study that has been used in about 20 schools in the San Francisco Bay Area. It, and other drug abuse education today, draws on decades of rigorous effectiveness research and the newest...

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