Search Results for: index.html

America’s ‘Beautiful People’ Are Changing

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) — It strikes no one as surprising when someone like Beyonce graces the cover of a magazine as an icon of beauty, but a new study suggests that was far more rare three decades ago. If People magazine is any indication, America’s definition of who’s “beautiful” has broadened to include more races and a wider span of ages. “This study analyzed photographs of celebrities who were deemed ‘beautiful’ by People magazine in 1990 compared to 2017,” explained study author Dr. Neelam Vashi. “We intended to answer a simple question: Did our perception of beauty change between 1990 and now?” Apparently it did. “This data suggests that maybe our society is starting to embrace graceful aging, diversity and the beauty we are born with,” Vashi said. In the study, after breaking down looks by hair, skin color, eye color, age, gender and race, the team found that “celebrities rated beautiful in 2017 were older, more often women, and had a higher rate of darker skin types and mixed race,” noted Vashi, who is director of the Boston University Center for Ethnic Skin. Why People magazine? Largely because of its readership of nearly 44 million adult readers, making it the most popular magazine in the United States, Vashi explained. She added that the magazine’s top-50 beauty list was first launched in 1990, and that editorial...

Read More

Energy Companies Don't Like the Clean Power Plan — or President Trump's Plan to Kill It

Donald Trump boasted last month that the Obama Administration’s plan to regulate power plants will soon be “boom, gone.” Energy companies long assumed that when the dust settled, Trump would then put forward a plan more to their liking. Instead, the Administration has no plans, and that’s making them nervous. The Environmental Protection Agency announced Tuesday that it would repeal the Clean Power Plan, which seeks to lower the amount of carbon dioxide emitted by power plants. But the agency currently has no plan to replace it either, surprising many energy company executives. “Most industry groups believe that the [Clean Power Plan] should be repealed,” said Jeff Holmstead, a former senior EPA official under George W. Bush who now represents energy companies, in...

Read More

California wine region ravaged by fast-spreading wildfires

California wine region ravaged by fast-spreading wildfires 9 October 2017 From the section US & Canada Media playback is unsupported on your device Media captionWildfires rip through California’s famous wine region Parts of California’s wine region are being ravaged by fast-spreading fires, destroying hundreds of homes and forcing mass evacuations. About 20,000 people have fled from Napa, Sonoma and Yuba counties after three fires broke out across the area renown for its vineyards. At least one person has reportedly died as the fires spread rapidly. The governor of California declared an emergency as fire-fighters battled to control the wild...

Read More

Silwan demolitions: ‘They’re destroying Jerusalem’

Silwan, Occupied East Jerusalem – For four hours, Abdul Karim Abu Sneina watched as a pair of bulldozers razed the two homes that he had built, leaving a dozen of his family members – including seven children – homeless. “Where can I live? There’s no place for us to live,” Abu Sneina said after the August demolition, standing in front of a mound of broken bricks and iron scraps. Residents of al-Bustan neighbourhood in the valley of Silwan had expected the bulldozers, fearing retaliation for their participation in summer protests that pressured Israeli authorities to remove newly installed metal detectors at al-Aqsa Mosque compound....

Read More

4 Takeaways From HHS Rollback Of Key Contraception Coverage Provision

On Friday, the Trump administration announced new regulations governing contraceptive coverage under the Affordable Care Act. The rules will make sweeping changes to the law’s requirement that most employers provide coverage of birth control with no out-of-pocket costs to women. The changes were hailed by religious groups, including the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, which said it was “a return to common sense, long-standing federal practice and peaceful coexistence between church and state.” But others, including the National Women’s Law Center, said they plan to file suit against the rules. The National Health Law Program said that the rules appeared “legally suspect.” Here are some frequently asked questions and answers about the new rules. Q: What is the new policy? Trump administration officials said they are significantly rolling back rules requiring many insurers to provide contraceptive coverage to women. Employers with a moral or religious objection to contraceptive services will be allowed to stop offering that coverage. Under provisions of the Affordable Care Act, the Obama administration had issued rules requiring most plans to cover all contraception methods that have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration with no out-of-pocket cost to women. The provision does not cover plans that have a grandfathered status under the law. That guarantee was whittled back through regulation and court actions to exempt some religious-based organizations, such as churches, and some privately held...

Read More